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Visitation as Human 'Right' or Earned 'Privilege' for Prisoners?

McCarthy, Daniel and Adams, Maria (2017) Visitation as Human 'Right' or Earned 'Privilege' for Prisoners? Journal of Social Welfare and Family Law, 39 (4). pp 403-416.

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Abstract

Prison visitation has been widely recognised as an important feature of a just and humane prison system, providing important benefits for prisoners and their family in maintaining ties. However, emphasis on maintaining prisoner–family ties over the sentence has remained a low priority for the prison service in England and Wales, with prison visits ideologically framed as a ‘privilege’ rather than a ‘right’ for prisoners. This paper contrasts England and Wales with Scotland where a diverging approach to supporting visitation and family contact has been implemented. In Scotland, a strong focus on human rights as a justification for these policies has occurred, in tandem with more palatable historical context of penal welfarism. This paper assesses differences between the two governmental approaches to prison visitation, situated in discussion of some of the broader resettlement outcomes which may be garnered via these policy responses.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences > Department of Sociology
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
McCarthy, Danield.mccarthy@surrey.ac.uk
Adams, Mariam.n.adams@surrey.ac.uk
Date : 27 October 2017
DOI : 10.1080/09649069.2017.1390292
Copyright Disclaimer : Copyright 2017 Taylor & Francis (Routledge)
Uncontrolled Keywords : Prisoners’ families; Visitation; Prison; Human rights
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 16 May 2017 15:38
Last Modified : 15 Nov 2019 14:33
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/820975

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