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Components of particulate matter air-pollution and brain tumors

Harbo Poulsen, Aslak, Arthur Hvidtfeldt, Ulla, Sørensen, Mette, Puett, Robin, Ketzel, Matthias, Brandt, Jørgen, Christensen, Jesper H., Geels, Camilla and Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole (2020) Components of particulate matter air-pollution and brain tumors Environment International, 144, 106046.

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Abstract

Background

Air pollution is an established carcinogen. Evidence for an association with brain tumors is, however, inconclusive. We investigated if individual particulate matter constituents were associated with brain tumor risk.

Methods

From comprehensive national registers, we identified all (n = 12 928) brain tumor cases, diagnosed in Denmark in the period 1989–2014, and selected 22 961 controls, matched on age, sex and year of birth. We established address histories and estimated 10-year mean residential outdoor concentrations of particulate matter ˂ 2.5 µm, primarily emitted black carbon (BC) and organic carbon (OC), and combined carbon (OC/BC), as well as secondary inorganic and organic PM air pollutants from a detailed dispersion model. We used conditional logistic regression to calculate odds ratios (OR) per inter quartile range (IQR) exposure. We adjusted for income, marital and employment status as well as area-level socio-demographic characteristics.

Results

Total tumors of the brain were associated with OC/BC (OR: 1.053, 95%CI: 1.005–1.103, per IQR). The data suggested strongest associations for malignant tumors with ORs per IQR for OC/BC, BC and OC of 1.063 (95% CI: 1.007–1.123), 1.036 (95% CI: 1.006–1.067) and 1.030 (95%CI: 0.979–1.085), respectively. The results did not indicate adverse effects of other PM components.

Conclusions

This large, population based study showed associations between primary emitted carbonaceous particles and risk for malignant brain tumors. As the first of its kind, this study needs replication.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences > Civil and Environmental Engineering
Authors : Harbo Poulsen, Aslak, Arthur Hvidtfeldt, Ulla, Sørensen, Mette, Puett, Robin, Ketzel, Matthias, Brandt, Jørgen, Christensen, Jesper H., Geels, Camilla and Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole
Date : November 2020
DOI : 10.1016/j.envint.2020.106046
Copyright Disclaimer : © 2020 Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/BY-NC-ND/4.0/).
Uncontrolled Keywords : Air-pollution; Particulate matter; Brain tumors; Epidemiology
Depositing User : Clive Harris
Date Deposited : 01 Oct 2020 15:40
Last Modified : 01 Oct 2020 15:41
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/858619

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