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Improving fatigue risk management in healthcare: A systematic scoping review of sleep-related/fatigue-management interventions for nurses and midwives

Querstret, Dawn, O'Brien, Katie, Skene, Debra J. and Maben, Jill (2020) Improving fatigue risk management in healthcare: A systematic scoping review of sleep-related/fatigue-management interventions for nurses and midwives International Journal of Nursing Studies, 106, 103513.

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Abstract

Background

Nurses and midwives make up almost 50% of the global healthcare shift working workforce. Shift work interferes with sleep and causes fatigue with adverse effects for nurses’ and midwives’ health, as well as on patient safety and care. Where other safety-critical sectors have developed Fatigue Risk Management Systems, healthcare is behind the curve; with published literature only focussing on the evaluation of discreet sleep-related/fatigue-management interventions. Little is known, however, about which interventions have been evaluated for nurses and midwives. Our review is a critical first step to building the evidence-base for healthcare organisations seeking to address this important operational issue.

Objectives

We address two questions: (1) what sleep-related/fatigue-management interventions have been assessed in nurses and midwives and what is their evidence-base? and (2) what measures are used by researchers to assess intervention effectiveness?

Design and data sources

The following databases were searched in November, 2018 with no limit on publication dates: MEDLINE, PsychINFO and CINAHL.

Review methods

We included: (1) studies conducted in adult samples of nurses and/or midwives that had evaluated a sleep-related/fatigue-management intervention; and (2) studies that reported intervention effects on fatigue, sleep, or performance at work, and on measures of attention or cognitive performance (as they relate to the impact of shift working on patient safety/care).

Results

The search identified 798 potentially relevant articles, out of which 32 met our inclusion criteria. There were 8619 participants across the included studies and all were nurses (88.6% female). We did not find any studies conducted in midwives nor any studies conducted in the UK, with most studies conducted in the US, Italy and Taiwan. There was heterogeneity both in terms of the interventions evaluated and the measures used to assess effectiveness. Napping could be beneficial but there was wide variation regarding nap duration and timing, and we need to understand more about barriers to implementation. Longer shifts, shift patterns including nights, and inadequate recovery time between shifts (quick returns) were associated with poorer sleep, increased sleepiness and increased levels of fatigue. Light exposure and/or light attenuation interventions showed promise but the literature was dominated by small, potentially unrepresentative samples.

Conclusions

The literature related to sleep-related/fatigue-management interventions for nurses and midwives is fragmented and lacks cohesion. Further empirical work is warranted with a view to developing comprehensive Fatigue Risk Management Systems to protect against fatigue in nurses, midwives, and other shift working healthcare staff.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Biosciences and Medicine
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Querstret, Dawndawn.querstret@surrey.ac.uk
O'Brien, Katiek.e.o'brien@surrey.ac.uk
Skene, Debra J.D.Skene@surrey.ac.uk
Maben, Jillj.maben@surrey.ac.uk
Date : June 2020
DOI : 10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2019.103513
Copyright Disclaimer : © 2020 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license
Uncontrolled Keywords : Circadian dysregulation; Fatigue; Night shift work; Nurses; Nurse-midwives; Patient care; Patient safety; Rotating shift work; Shift work schedule; Sleep
Depositing User : Clive Harris
Date Deposited : 20 May 2020 17:46
Last Modified : 20 May 2020 17:46
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/856966

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