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A Portfolio of Academic, Therapeutic Practice and Research Work Including an Investigation Into Therapists' Experiences and Perceptions of Working With Young Men Who Self Harm.

Zandvoort, Michelle. (2007) A Portfolio of Academic, Therapeutic Practice and Research Work Including an Investigation Into Therapists' Experiences and Perceptions of Working With Young Men Who Self Harm. Doctoral thesis, University of Surrey (United Kingdom)..

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Abstract

In recent years there has been an increase in awareness that self-harm occurs in men, especially in young men in their early teens to mid twenties, and that it seems to be increasing. This article presents findings from a qualitative study in which nine therapists were interviewed as key informants about their experiences and perceptions of working with young men who self-harm. Transcripts were subjected to Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. The resultant themes focussed on a variety of risk factors involved in the development and maintenance of self-harm in young men. Many were non-gender specific except for the role of masculinity and male identity in terms of hegemonic expectations. Other domains included the conceptualisation of self-harm; relationship with self; factors in the therapeutic process and challenges that the therapists experienced. The study may be seen as further raising awareness of self-harm in young men and potentially informing effective therapeutic interventions. However, future research would need to include the views of self-harming young men themselves to discern the extent to which these are accurately reflected in the accounts of the therapists as key-informants due to possible biases the therapists may have had.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Divisions : Theses
Authors : Zandvoort, Michelle.
Date : 2007
Additional Information : Thesis (Psych.D.)--University of Surrey (United Kingdom), 2007.
Depositing User : EPrints Services
Date Deposited : 14 May 2020 15:43
Last Modified : 14 May 2020 15:49
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/856885

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