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Low Cost Capture Using Multi-Body Dynamics.

Utku, Ash. (2013) Low Cost Capture Using Multi-Body Dynamics. Doctoral thesis, University of Surrey (United Kingdom)..

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Abstract

Within the last decades, low-energy transfers and capture problem have been studied extensively to understand the dynamical structure of complex multi-body problem with a view to make the space missions much cheaper. Especially in this area, dynamical features of Circular Restricted 3-Body Problem (CR3BP), which is perfectly fitted to the many binary systems in our solar system, is used to determine advantageous and promising low-cost transfer trajectories. However, the capture concept around smaller body, which is highly influenced by gravity force of bigger body in CR3BP, is still being one of the most challenging problems, because of highly chaotic dynamical nature around there. Previously, capture problem have been studied through mapping methods to gather insight into its chaotic dynamics. Although these type of mapping methods can be only adequate for the visualization of planar solution space and provide restricted dynamical insight into planar-capture, they complicate the visualization of the 3-Dimension solution space, and for this reason, making general capture dynamics more difficult to comprehend. However, in this research, a noval map method is designed, which reduces the order of 3-dimension CR3BP, condensing quantities of information into a 2-dimensional image. Thus the 3D capture problem can be better visualized and comprehended. Using this map, any type of low-cost planetary and orbital capture trajectories, including difficult and sensitive permanent captures, which provide completely zero-cost capture solutions, can be found. Therefore, space missions can be not only much cheaper, but also can be more flexible and adaptable to varous conditions.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Divisions : Theses
Authors : Utku, Ash.
Date : 2013
Additional Information : Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Surrey (United Kingdom), 2013.
Depositing User : EPrints Services
Date Deposited : 14 May 2020 14:56
Last Modified : 14 May 2020 15:02
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/856725

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