University of Surrey

Test tubes in the lab Research in the ATI Dance Research

Mobility Management Protocols for All-IP Cellular Networks.

Wang, Meng. (2012) Mobility Management Protocols for All-IP Cellular Networks. Doctoral thesis, University of Surrey (United Kingdom)..

[img]
Preview
Text
10074631.pdf
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial Share Alike.

Download (92MB) | Preview

Abstract

Traditionally, cellular networks have not utilised IP based protocols for their mobility management. However, with the increasing demands of mobile Internet and IP based user applications, the cellular networks have started to evolve to be All-IP network. Adapting the IP based mobility management protocols to the IP based cellular network involves many challenging issues. In this context, this thesis addresses this challenging task to design purely IP based mobility management protocols for All-IP cellular networks. The thesis first investigates the signalling performance of the current tunnelling protocol based mobility management schemes in IP based cellular networks by the proposed OPNET based simulator. The results reveal that large signalling overhead is introduced by the tunnelling protocols based schemes for the handover process. Consequently to eliminate the disadvantages of current approaches, the thesis proposes a purely IP based mobility management scheme based on the Host Identity Protocol (HIP) and on a distributed mobility management architecture. Following this approach, a micro-mobility management scheme is proposed to reduce the extensive signalling exchanges of HIP based handover. Furthermore, a mobility context cache based approach is proposed to optimise the handover performance based on reducing the signalling exchanges during handover completion phase. The approach has been evaluated by applying to 3GPP based networks. Performance evaluation shows that the proposed optimisation can reduce both the handover interruption time for both 3 GPP standardised and proposed mobility management schemes. Finally, due to the lack of an accurate analytical model for the mobility management signalling analysis in the cellular networks, an analytical modelling framework is proposed. The results show that it can be used to predict the mobility management related signalling load with reasonable accuracy compared with the simulation results.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Divisions : Theses
Authors : Wang, Meng.
Date : 2012
Additional Information : Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Surrey (United Kingdom), 2012.
Depositing User : EPrints Services
Date Deposited : 14 May 2020 14:56
Last Modified : 14 May 2020 14:59
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/856693

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year


Information about this web site

© The University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, United Kingdom.
+44 (0)1483 300800