University of Surrey

Test tubes in the lab Research in the ATI Dance Research

The Effectiveness of the Personality Assessment Inventory in Detecting Exaggerated Psychological Symptoms of Traumatic Brain Injury.

Virdee, Gursharan. (2011) The Effectiveness of the Personality Assessment Inventory in Detecting Exaggerated Psychological Symptoms of Traumatic Brain Injury. Doctoral thesis, University of Surrey (United Kingdom)..

[img]
Preview
Text
10073295.pdf
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial Share Alike.

Download (11MB) | Preview

Abstract

Background: In this study the identification of exaggerated psychological symptoms of traumatic brain injury (TBI) is suggested as an additional method in strengthening the detection of Malingered Neurocognitive Dysfunction. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) in detecting exaggerated psychological symptoms of TBI. Method: A three-group simulation quasi-experimental design was used to compare outcomes on the eleven Clinical scales of the PAI, and three Validity indices: Negative Impression Scale (NIM), Malingering Index (MAL), and Rogers Discriminant Function (RDF). The three participant groups included a TBI group (n=30), a control group (n=30), and a simulator group (n=30). The ability of the Validity indices to detect exaggerators (simulator group), and accurately detect non-exaggerators (TBI and healthy group) was examined. Results: Overall, no evidence of difference was found between the simulator and TBI group on the eleven Clinical scales, or on the NIM index. Differences were found between the TBI and control group, and the simulator and control group, on six of the Clinical scales and the NIM index. No difference was found between all three participant groups on the MAL index. The RDF index yielded a significant difference between the TBI and simulator group. On the whole, all three of the Validity indices, at suggested cut-offs indicating exaggerated psychological symptoms, showed limited ability to accurately detect exaggerators (simulator group), and undesirable to perfect ability to accurately detect non-exaggerators (TBI and control group). Conclusions: The results showed that the TBI group expressed specific psychological difficulties in comparison to the control group, and these difficulties were closely replicated by the simulator group. Results also showed limited utility of the PAI as a measure of detecting exaggerated psychological symptoms of TBI.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Divisions : Theses
Authors : Virdee, Gursharan.
Date : 2011
Additional Information : Thesis (Psych.D.)--University of Surrey (United Kingdom), 2011.
Depositing User : EPrints Services
Date Deposited : 14 May 2020 14:56
Last Modified : 14 May 2020 14:59
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/856683

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year


Information about this web site

© The University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, United Kingdom.
+44 (0)1483 300800