University of Surrey

Test tubes in the lab Research in the ATI Dance Research

A Portfolio of Study, Practice and Research: An Exploratory Study to Investigate How People With Learning Disabilities Understand and Describe Pain.

Stone Pearn, Helena. (2002) A Portfolio of Study, Practice and Research: An Exploratory Study to Investigate How People With Learning Disabilities Understand and Describe Pain. Doctoral thesis, University of Surrey (United Kingdom)..

[img]
Preview
Text
27731938.pdf
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial Share Alike.

Download (204MB) | Preview

Abstract

This study explored how people with learning disabilities understood and described pain. It investigated how participants described the general concept of pain, as well as specific types of pain. It also considered which forms of inquiry were most useful in enabling participants to describe specific types of pain, and included an evaluation of the use of pictures for pain. Semi-structured interviews were used to elicit the accounts of six women and five men with significant to severe intellectual impairment whose ages ranged from 32 to 75 years. Verbatim interview transcripts were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis (Smith, 1996) and content analysis. Analysis revealed that although not all participants had an immediate answer to ‘what is pain?”, over the course of the interview pain and pain-related experiences were described, and these were consistently described in negative terms. There was a high level of inter-individual variability in the amount of description given. Participants’ responses were grouped into themes, and a number of themes corresponded with important information needed for medical diagnoses (eg. intensity/severity, type/nature, duration and location). It was unusual for participants to spontaneously provide terms for different pain types, but many were recognised when supplied by the researcher. There was no definitive form of inquiry which was most useful, however specific verbal prompting elicited the greatest number of descriptions. The findings were considered in relation to existing literature and to potential clinical implications. Methodological issues were also discussed. Specific suggestions for clinical practice were put forward, and directions for future research proposed.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Divisions : Theses
Authors : Stone Pearn, Helena.
Date : 2002
Additional Information : Thesis (Psych.D.)--University of Surrey (United Kingdom), 2002.
Depositing User : EPrints Services
Date Deposited : 14 May 2020 14:27
Last Modified : 14 May 2020 14:31
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/856626

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year


Information about this web site

© The University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, United Kingdom.
+44 (0)1483 300800