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The Sexual Risk Cognitions Questionnaire: A Reliability and Validity Study.

Shah, Deepti. (1996) The Sexual Risk Cognitions Questionnaire: A Reliability and Validity Study. Doctoral thesis, University of Surrey (United Kingdom)..

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Abstract

The present research is concerned with the development of an instrument, the Sexual Risk Cognitions Questionnaire (SRCQ). It is designed to measure automatic thoughts related to unsafe sexual behaviour. A number of instruments already exist However, none met the specific needs of the Riverside HIV Sexual Risk Reduction project2, or specifically measured automatic cognitions related to unsafe sexual behaviour. The current research is not intended to test a single theory of HIV risk taking behaviour. The measure was developed to tap into one facet, automatic thoughts related to unsafe sexual behaviour. It is derived from contemporary social cognitive models applied to HIV risk (e.g. Gold, et al. 1992; Tallis, 1995; Bandura, 1986; Catania et al., 1990; Fisher and Fisher, 1992). It is anticipated that the instrument will measure automatic thoughts related to condom use and this will be associated with actual risk behaviour levels. Initially epidemiological evidence on the spread of HIV, emphasising the role of sexual behaviour is presented. This is followed by a review of the current literature on factors related to unsafe sexual behaviour and the theoretical models applied to unsafe sexual behaviour. The review will show that little work has been conducted on specific cognitive factors, in particular the automatic thoughts activated during sexual arousal. This is followed by a description of the development of the SRCQ and its implications for further research.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Divisions : Theses
Authors : Shah, Deepti.
Date : 1996
Additional Information : Thesis (Psych.D.)--University of Surrey (United Kingdom), 1996.
Depositing User : EPrints Services
Date Deposited : 14 May 2020 14:03
Last Modified : 14 May 2020 14:09
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/856466

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