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A mechanism for learning with sleep spindles

Peyrache, Adrien and Seibt, Julie (2020) A mechanism for learning with sleep spindles Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 375 (1799), 20190230. pp. 1-14.

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Abstract

Spindles are ubiquitous oscillations during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. A growing body of evidence points to a possible link with learning and memory, and the underlying mechanisms are now starting to be unveiled. Specifically, spindles are associated with increased dendritic activity and high intracellular calcium levels, a situation favourable to plasticity, as well as with control of spiking output by feed-forward inhibition. During spindles, thalamocortical networks become unresponsive to inputs, thus potentially preventing interference between memory-related internal information processing and extrinsic signals. At the system level, spindles are co-modulated with other major NREM oscillations, including hippocampal sharp wave-ripples (SWRs) and neocortical slow waves, both previously shown to be associated with learning and memory. The sequential occurrence of reactivation at the time of SWRs followed by neuronal plasticity-promoting spindles is a possible mechanism to explain NREM sleep-dependent consolidation of memories.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Biosciences and Medicine
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Peyrache, Adrien
Seibt, Juliej.seibt@surrey.ac.uk
Date : 25 May 2020
Funders : University of Surrey, Braitwaite Family Foundation, UK, Wellcome Trust
DOI : 10.1098/rstb.2019.0230
Copyright Disclaimer : © 2020 The Author(s). Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.
Additional Information : This article is part of the Theo Murphy meeting issue ‘Memory reactivation: replaying events past, present and future'.
Depositing User : Clive Harris
Date Deposited : 07 May 2020 16:29
Last Modified : 09 Jun 2020 15:10
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/856371

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