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A Portfolio of Academic, Theraputic Practice and Research Work Including an Investigation of Alcoholism and Attributional Process.

Pavlidis, Maria. (1997) A Portfolio of Academic, Theraputic Practice and Research Work Including an Investigation of Alcoholism and Attributional Process. Doctoral thesis, University of Surrey (United Kingdom)..

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Abstract

Aims: The aim of this study was to observe attributional change in alcoholic clients receiving the motivational interviewing counselling intervention. It was hypothesised that clients would demonstrate an internal bias in their attributional style once receiving this intervention, and having progressed through Prochaska & DiClemente's transtheoretical stages of change. Design: A between groups design was initially planned for this study, whereby clients would be allocated according to the Prochaska & DiClemente stages of change. Setting: The study was carried out across three alcohol misuse services. Participants: A total of 20 clients agreed to participate within this study. Three out of the respondents met the studies exclusion criteria. Measurements: Clients were given the IPSAQ, GHQ-28 and Readiness to Change Questionnaire to complete. Findings: It was found that clients within this study displayed an overall tendency towards internal attributions for positive events, and were less likely to use causal internal attributions for negative events. It was also found that 59 % of the total sample made alcohol referenced attributions for positive and negative events. This paper discusses the implications of these findings within the context of therapeutic interventions and attribution therapy, when working with clients presenting with an addictive behaviour. 

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Divisions : Theses
Authors : Pavlidis, Maria.
Date : 1997
Additional Information : Thesis (Psych.D.)--University of Surrey (United Kingdom), 1997.
Depositing User : EPrints Services
Date Deposited : 06 May 2020 14:23
Last Modified : 06 May 2020 14:32
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/856217

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