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An Investigation of the Relationship Between Self-Ambivalence, Self-Discrepancy, and Autogenous and Reactive Obsessions.

Pointer, Jonathan. (2011) An Investigation of the Relationship Between Self-Ambivalence, Self-Discrepancy, and Autogenous and Reactive Obsessions. Doctoral thesis, University of Surrey (United Kingdom)..

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Abstract

Objective: Recent theorising highlights a role for self-concept discrepancies in the onset and maintenance of obsessions. This theorising suggests that self-concept discrepancies might be more influential in the occurrence of autogenous as opposed to reactive obsessions. The aim of the current study was to investigate the relationship between self-ambivalence, self-discrepancy, and autogenous and reactive obsessions whilst controlling for dysphoria. Design: This study employed a cross-sectional correlational design in a non-clinical general population sample. Three hundred and seventy-six (22.6% male, mean age: 26.60, SD: 9.27; 77.4% female, mean age: 26.13, SD: 8.63) participants completed measures of self-ambivalence, self-discrepancy, obsessionality (both autogenous and reactive obsessions) and dysphoria. Findings: Self-ambivalence was positively associated with obsessionality, after controlling for dysphoria. There was no difference in the strength of the positive association between autogenous obsessions and self-ambivalence, and between reactive obsessions, after controlling for dysphoria. There was no association between self-discrepancies and obsessionality, after controlling for dysphoria. Conclusions: Self-ambivalence plays a small part in obsessionality, but subtyping obsessions into autogenous and reactive may not be a helpful distinction. Although self-discrepancy was not associated with obsessionality, there was a strong association between self-discrepancy and dysphoria, which may have clinical implications for alleviating negative mood. Other theoretical and clinical implications are discussed, as are suggestions for further research.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Divisions : Theses
Authors : Pointer, Jonathan.
Date : 2011
Additional Information : Thesis (Psych.D.)--University of Surrey (United Kingdom), 2011.
Depositing User : EPrints Services
Date Deposited : 06 May 2020 14:23
Last Modified : 06 May 2020 14:32
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/856208

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