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A Portfolio of Study, Therapeutic Practice and Research Work Including an Investigation of the Effect of Anticipated and Enacted Stigma Upon Siblings of People With Mental Illness and Implications for Therapeutic Practice.

Newbold, Loraine. (2007) A Portfolio of Study, Therapeutic Practice and Research Work Including an Investigation of the Effect of Anticipated and Enacted Stigma Upon Siblings of People With Mental Illness and Implications for Therapeutic Practice. Doctoral thesis, University of Surrey (United Kingdom)..

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Abstract

Background; Modified Labeling Theory (MLT) proposes that for individuals diagnosed with psychiatric disorders, the internalisation of negative stereotypes associated with mental illness, can lead to fears of rejection. This anticipation of stigma, in combination with reliance upon coping strategies that restrict social interactions, can be associated with lower self esteem (Link, 1987; Link et al. 1989; 1997). Aims; To extend MLT to consider the experiences of siblings of persons with mental illness by exploring the relationships between stigma, self esteem, and the use of disclosure as a coping strategy. Methods: A cross-sectional design was employed with eighty five siblings of persons with mental illness completing a range of measures, including three new measures designed for this study to assess individual levels of anticipated stigma, enacted stigma and the use of disclosure as a coping strategy. Results: The predictions offered by MLT were supported by this study. Both anticipated and enacted stigma were significantly negatively correlated with self esteem and disclosure. Conclusions: This study highlights the need for therapeutic practitioners to be aware of how stigma may contribute to psychological distress of siblings of persons with mental illness, and impact upon the therapeutic process.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Divisions : Theses
Authors : Newbold, Loraine.
Date : 2007
Additional Information : Thesis (Psych.D.)--University of Surrey (United Kingdom), 2007.
Depositing User : EPrints Services
Date Deposited : 06 May 2020 14:15
Last Modified : 12 Aug 2020 13:00
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/856110

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