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An Investigation of Long-Term Memory and Executive Functioning in Adults with Down Syndrome.

Morris, Julian. (2003) An Investigation of Long-Term Memory and Executive Functioning in Adults with Down Syndrome. Doctoral thesis, University of Surrey (United Kingdom)..

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Abstract

The concepts of multiple memory systems and the modularity of brain functioning offer a theoretical basis for the possible existence of specific cognitive strengths and weaknesses in different learning-disabled groups. Previous studies have highlighted an impairment in the verbal short-term memory of people with Down’s syndrome (DS), but there have been few studies exploring the long-term memory of this population. There also appear to be no studies of executive functioning in this group. A number of tests of long-term memory and executive functioning were therefore administered to a group of adults with DS (n=12) and a control group of adults with a learning disability of non-specific aetiology (n=l 6). The DS group performed significantly worse than the control group on three tests of verbal long-term memory. There was no significant difference between the two groups on a test of long-term visual memory. This pattern of results transferred to everyday memory tasks. Despite difficulties with the interpretation of some of the results, a specific weakness in the long-term retention and/or recall of verbal information in people with DS was specified from one of the memory tests. The DS group also performed significantly worse than the control group on one test of executive functioning. However, more research is needed before hypotheses about specific strengths and weaknesses in this area can be constructed. A number of implications for clinical practice and ideas for future research were suggested.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Divisions : Theses
Authors : Morris, Julian.
Date : 2003
Additional Information : Thesis (Psych.D.)--University of Surrey (United Kingdom), 2003.
Depositing User : EPrints Services
Date Deposited : 06 May 2020 14:06
Last Modified : 06 May 2020 14:10
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/856007

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