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Using Science and the Natural Environment to Inform Musical Composition a Portfolio of Original Compositions, with a Subsidiary Research Project: ‘Audience Reception and Promotion of Contemporary Classical Music in the UK’.

Jarman, Jill. (2010) Using Science and the Natural Environment to Inform Musical Composition a Portfolio of Original Compositions, with a Subsidiary Research Project: ‘Audience Reception and Promotion of Contemporary Classical Music in the UK’. Doctoral thesis, University of Surrey (United Kingdom)..

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Abstract

This submission comprises a portfolio of compositions with accompanying programme notes, reflective notes and recordings supported by a research project ‘Audience reception and promotion of contemporary classical music in the UK’. The main part of the submission contains four compositions that seek to answer questions of how, and to what extent, science and the natural environment can inform musical composition. This enquiry in part addresses the research project question of how contemporary classical music could connect with a wider public without compromising the music. The first piece, Soundwaves of Light (2005), is written for large orchestra and is informed by light emissions from the stars. Tone rows and harmonies were decided upon based on calculations of a stars frequency, the calculations were provided by Dr Paul Stevenson, University of Surrey. The second piece, clouds (2007), is informed by the natural environment, written for unaccompanied chamber choir and soprano soloist, and draws upon an eclectic mix of vocal styles. Shadows (2008), is written for a wind, brass and percussion ensemble bringing together jazz and classical musicians. In the final composition, H2O (2009-10), the behaviour of an orchestra is dictated by the molecular structure of water in three different states: solid, liquid, and gas. A new chordal device was designed to take dominant seventh-type chords away from an obvious tonality. The supporting project examines a popular 17th century music venue, Vauxhall Gardens, to ascertain which, if any, factors could be transferred to music promotion and audience reception today. Following chapters discuss feedback from an anecdotal audience survey, listening preferences in young children, and a discussion surrounding the central research inquiry arising from questions posited to contemporary classical music promoters.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Divisions : Theses
Authors : Jarman, Jill.
Date : 2010
Additional Information : Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Surrey (United Kingdom), 2010.
Depositing User : EPrints Services
Date Deposited : 06 May 2020 11:56
Last Modified : 06 May 2020 12:00
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/855594

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