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Glucose Administration Effects On Sensorimotor Function and Declarative Memory.

Hope, Christopher. (2012) Glucose Administration Effects On Sensorimotor Function and Declarative Memory. Doctoral thesis, University of Surrey (United Kingdom)..

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Abstract

This thesis aimed to examine the effects of glucose drink administration on sensorimotor function (studies 1 - 3) and declarative memory (study 4). Glucose had no effect on a modified version of the Hick task in study 1. However in study 2 we observed that glucose slowed reaction times (RTs) during the initial performance of the Eriksen flanker task. One possible reason for this effect is that glucose only slows sensorimotor function when a response is weakly associated with a stimulus, such as at the beginning of task performance. In study 1 stimulus-response (S-R) associations may have been too strong to observe a glucose slowing effect. Here participants performed a greater number of training trials and stimuli were arguably mapped more directly to a response compared to study 2. In study 3 we tested the hypothesis that glucose slows sensorimotor function when S-R associations are weak. Here we used a letter version of the Eriksen flanker task and kept S-R association consistently low by changing the stimulus set to a novel pair of letters every 80 trials. We found that glucose constantly slowed RTs for the duration of this task, a result which is congruent with the hypothesis that glucose slows sensorimotor function when S-R associations are weak. In study 4 we focused on the effects of glucose administration on declarative memory function and sought to determine whether glucose affected the encoding of stimuli in a word recognition task. Here we used ERPs as an online measure of encoding processes. Our findings were that glucose enhanced recognition performance, replicating the well established effect that glucose-facilitates declarative memory. Furthermore, during encoding, glucose affected ERP components associated with early sensory processing, visual word-form generation, lexical/semantic access and long-term memory encoding/consolidation. Furthermore there was a correlation between recognition performance and the degree to which glucose amplified the N400 component, an ERP potential associated with lexical/semantic access. The results of this study therefore indicate that glucose modulates encoding processes and that these effects may, at least partially, underlie the glucose facilitation of declarative memory.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Divisions : Theses
Authors : Hope, Christopher.
Date : 2012
Additional Information : Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Surrey (United Kingdom), 2012.
Depositing User : EPrints Services
Date Deposited : 06 May 2020 11:53
Last Modified : 06 May 2020 11:53
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/855548

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