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Maternal iodine status during pregnancy is not consistently associated with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder or autistic traits in the child

Levie, Deborah, Bath, Sarah, Guxens, Monica, Korevaar, Tim I.M, Dineva, Mariana, Fano, Eduardo, Ibarlueza, Jesus M., Llop, Sabrina, Murica, Mario, Rayman, Margaret P. , Sunyer, Jordi, Peeters, Robin P. and Tiemieer, Henning (2020) Maternal iodine status during pregnancy is not consistently associated with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder or autistic traits in the child Journal of Nutrition.

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Abstract

Background: Severe iodine deficiency during pregnancy can cause intellectual disability, presumably through inadequate placental transfer of maternal thyroid hormone to the fetus. The association between mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency and child neurodevelopmental problems is not well understood. Objective: We investigated the association of maternal iodine status during pregnancy with child attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autistic traits. Methods: Collaborative study of three population-based birth cohorts: Generation R (N=1634), INMA (N=1293), and ALSPAC (N=2619). Exclusion criteria were multiple fetuses, fertility treatment, thyroid-interfering medication use, and pre-existing thyroid disease. The mean age of assessment in the cohorts was between 4.4 – 7.7 years for ADHD symptoms and 4.5 – 7.6 years for autistic traits. We studied the association of the urinary iodine-to-creatinine ratio (UI/Creat) < 150 μg/g – in all mother-child pairs, and in those with a urinary-iodine measurement at ≤ 18 weeks and ≤ 14 weeks of gestation – with the risk of ADHD or a high autistic-trait score (≥ 93rd percentile cut-off), using logistic regression. The cohort-specific effect estimates were combined by random effects meta-analyses. We also investigated whether UI/Creat modified the association of maternal free thyroxine (FT4) or thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) concentrations with ADHD or autistic traits. Results: UI/Creat <150 μg/g was not associated with ADHD [odds ratio (OR): 1.2; 95% CI: 0.7, 19 2.2; P=0.56] or with a high autistic-trait score (OR: 0.8; 95% CI: 0.6-1.1; P=0.22). UI/Creat <150 20 μg/g in early pregnancy (i.e., ≤ 18 weeks or ≤ 14 weeks of gestation) was not associated with a higher risk of behavioral problems. The association between a higher FT4 and a greater risk of ADHD (OR: 1.3; 95% CI: 1.0, 1.6; P=0.017) was not modified by iodine status. Conclusion: There is no consistent evidence to support an association of mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency during pregnancy with child ADHD or autistic traits.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Biosciences and Medicine
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Levie, Deborah
Bath, Sarahs.bath@surrey.ac.uk
Guxens, Monica
Korevaar, Tim I.M
Dineva, Mariana
Fano, Eduardo
Ibarlueza, Jesus M.
Llop, Sabrina
Murica, Mario
Rayman, Margaret P.
Sunyer, Jordi
Peeters, Robin P.
Tiemieer, Henning
Date : 11 February 2020
Uncontrolled Keywords : Keywords: iodine, deficiency, pregnancy, nutrition, behavior problems, ALSPAC, INMA, 27 Generation R
Depositing User : James Marshall
Date Deposited : 28 Feb 2020 14:26
Last Modified : 13 Mar 2020 15:11
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/853849

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