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Phenomenological-contextualist accounts of the experience of obsessions and compulsions: a theoretical thematic analysis study

Onabanjo, Orinayo (2020) Phenomenological-contextualist accounts of the experience of obsessions and compulsions: a theoretical thematic analysis study Doctoral thesis, University of Surrey.

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Abstract

The experience of obsessions and compulsions in the form of the diagnostic construct OCD has been widely researched. The majority of this research adopts a medical model perspective underpinned by an objectivist philosophy which does not account for the constitutive role relational contexts play in the experience of obsessions and compulsions. More recently, research has begun to attend more explicitly to the relational experience of OCD by investigating the impact this has on the diagnosed individuals’ relationships with others. However, such research is scarce. Therefore, this study aimed to build on this knowledge, by exploring the intersubjective understanding of obsessions and compulsions from a standpoint that is inherently relational. This was achieved through theoretical thematic analysis, whereby the intersubjective experience of obsessions and compulsions was explored from the vantage point of intersubjectivity systems theory (IST). Semi-structured interviews were conducted with six participants, leading to the construction of four overarching themes: “emotional unavailability in the family system”, “sense of separation leading to relational disconnection”, “shielding the self because hell is other people” and “finding a place of safety”. The findings suggest that relational disconnection and emotional isolation are a significant source of distress to individuals affected.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Divisions : Theses
Authors : Onabanjo, Orinayo
Date : 28 February 2020
Funders : N/A
DOI : 10.15126/thesis.00853556
Contributors :
ContributionNameEmailORCID
http://www.loc.gov/loc.terms/relators/THSRumble, Benjaminb.p.rumble@surrey.ac.uk
Depositing User : Orinayo Onabanjo
Date Deposited : 06 Mar 2020 12:55
Last Modified : 06 Mar 2020 12:56
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/853556

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