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Gut commensal bacteria show beneficial properties as wildlife probiotics

Stedman, Anna, van Vliet, Arnoud, Chambers, Mark and Gutierrez, Jorge (2020) Gut commensal bacteria show beneficial properties as wildlife probiotics Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences.

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Stedman et al. 2020. Ann NY Acad Sci_Revised.pdf - Accepted version Manuscript
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Abstract

Probiotics represent a non-invasive, environmentally-friendly alternative to reduce infectious diseases in wildlife species. Our aim was to evaluate the potential of typical gut commensals, such as lactic acid bacteria (LAB), as wildlife probiotics. The selected LAB were isolated from European badgers (Meles meles); a wildlife reservoir of bovine tuberculosis, and comprised four different genera: Enterococcus; Weissella; Pediococcus; and Lactobacillus. The enterococci displayed a phenotype and genotype that correlate with the production of antibacterial peptides and stimulation of antiviral responses. However, these isolates carry virulence and antibiotic resistance genes. Weissella showed some anti-mycobacterial activity due to their ability to produce lactate and ethanol. Interestingly, lactobacilli and pediococci modulated pro-inflammatory phagocytic responses that associate with protection against pathogens; and these responses agreed with the presence of immunomodulatory markers in their genomes. Although both lactobacilli and pediococci showed tolerance to antibiotics, this resistance was naturally acquired and almost all isolates possessed a strong phylogenetic relationship with isolates from food and healthy animals. Our results show that LAB display probiotic benefits that depend on the genera. Lactobacilli and pediococci are probably the most interesting candidates as probiotics against infectious diseases in wildlife because of their food-grade status and ability to modulate protective innate immune responses.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Biosciences and Medicine
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Stedman, Annaanna.stedman@surrey.ac.uk
van Vliet, Arnouda.vanvliet@surrey.ac.uk
Chambers, Markm.chambers@surrey.ac.uk
Gutierrez, Jorgej.gutierrez@surrey.ac.uk
Date : 5 January 2020
Funders : Morris Animal Foundation
Uncontrolled Keywords : Lactic Acid Bacteria, Probiotics, Wildlife, Genome, Antimicrobials, Immunomodulation
Depositing User : James Marshall
Date Deposited : 29 Jan 2020 10:20
Last Modified : 29 Jan 2020 10:20
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/853464

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