University of Surrey

Test tubes in the lab Research in the ATI Dance Research

Ground-Based High-DOF AI And Robotics Demonstrator For In-Orbit Space Optical Telescope Assembly

Hao, Zhou, Mavrakis, Nikos, Proenca, Pedro, Gillham Darnley, Richard, Fallah, Saber, Sweeting, Martin and Gao, Yang (2019) Ground-Based High-DOF AI And Robotics Demonstrator For In-Orbit Space Optical Telescope Assembly In: 70th International Astronautical Congress, 2019-10-21-2019-10-25, Washington, D.C., United States.

[img]
Preview
Text
iac2019_Compressed_v4.pdf - Accepted version Manuscript

Download (3MB) | Preview

Abstract

Astrophysicists demand larger (mirror diameter > 10m) space optical telescopes to investigate more distant events that happened during the very early period of the universe, for example formations of the earliest stars. The deployable telescope design like James Webb Space Telescope that has a 6.5m diameter primary mirror has already reached the capacity limits of the existing launch vehicles. Therefore, the space industry has been considering using robotic technologies to build future optical reflecting three-mirror structured space telescopes in orbit from smaller components.

One of the design paradigms is to use a high-DOF manipulator on a free-flying platform to build the optical telescope in orbit. This approach requires high precision and accuracy in the robotic manipulation GNC system that has several challenges yet to be addressed: 1. Orbital environmental parameters that affect sensing and perception; 2. Limitations in robotic hardware, trajectory planning algorithms and controllers.

To investigate these problems for in-orbit manipulation, the UK national hub on future AI and robotics for space (FAIR-SPACE) at the Surrey Space Centre (SSC) has been developing a ground-based hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) robotic demonstrator to simulate in-orbit manipulation. The key elements of the demonstrator are two 6-DOF manipulators and a re-configurable sensor system. One of the manipulators with a > 3-DOF gripping mechanism represents the assembly manipulator on a spacecraft whose orbital dynamics, kinematics, and environmental disturbances and uncertainties are propagated in a computer. The other 6-DOF manipulator with a torque/force sensor is used as a gravity offoad mechanism to carry the space telescope mirror segment. The relative motions between the service/manipulation arm and the mirror segment are computed and then executed by the second arm. The sensor system provides visual feedback of the end-effector and uses computer vision and AI to estimate the pose and position of the mirror segment respectively. The demonstrator aims to verify and validate the manipulator assembly approach for future large space optical telescopes against ground truth and benchmarks.

This paper explains the motivation behind developing this testbed and introduces the current hardware setup of the testbed and its key features.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Conference Paper)
Divisions : Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences > Electronic Engineering
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Hao, Zhouz.hao@surrey.ac.uk
Mavrakis, Nikosn.mavrakis@surrey.ac.uk
Proenca, Pedrop.f.proenca@surrey.ac.uk
Gillham Darnley, Richardr.gillhamdarnley@surrey.ac.uk
Fallah, Sabers.fallah@surrey.ac.uk
Sweeting, MartinM.Sweeting@surrey.ac.uk
Gao, YangYang.Gao@surrey.ac.uk
Date : 21 October 2019
Funders : UK Research Innovation (UKRI), EPSRC - Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, UK Space Agency
Copyright Disclaimer : Copyright 2019 by International Astronautical Federation (IAF)
Uncontrolled Keywords : Space Robotics; On Orbit Assembly; Space Manipulator,; Space Telescope; AI; Orbital Robotics
Related URLs :
Depositing User : Diane Maxfield
Date Deposited : 14 Jan 2020 14:57
Last Modified : 14 Jan 2020 15:07
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/853323

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year


Information about this web site

© The University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, United Kingdom.
+44 (0)1483 300800