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Acute kidney disease and renal recovery: Consensus report of the Acute Disease Quality Initiative (ADQI) 16 Workgroup

Chawla, L.S., Bellomo, R., Bihorac, A., Goldstein, S.L., Siew, E.D., Bagshaw, S.M., Bittleman, D., Cruz, D., Endre, Z., Fitzgerald, R.L. , Forni, L., Kane-Gill, S.L., Hoste, E., Koyner, J., Liu, K.D., MacEdo, E., Mehta, R., Murray, P., Nadim, M., Ostermann, M., Palevsky, P.M., Pannu, N., Rosner, M., Wald, R., Zarbock, A., Ronco, C. and Kellum, J.A. (2017) Acute kidney disease and renal recovery: Consensus report of the Acute Disease Quality Initiative (ADQI) 16 Workgroup Nature Reviews Nephrology, 13 (4). pp. 241-257.

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Abstract

Consensus definitions have been reached for both acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) and these definitions are now routinely used in research and clinical practice. The KDIGO guideline defines AKI as an abrupt decrease in kidney function occurring over 7 days or less, whereas CKD is defined by the persistence of kidney disease for a period of >90 days. AKI and CKD are increasingly recognized as related entities and in some instances probably represent a continuum of the disease process. For patients in whom pathophysiologic processes are ongoing, the term acute kidney disease (AKD) has been proposed to define the course of disease after AKI; however, definitions of AKD and strategies for the management of patients with AKD are not currently available. In this consensus statement, the Acute Disease Quality Initiative (ADQI) proposes definitions, staging criteria for AKD, and strategies for the management of affected patients. We also make recommendations for areas of future research, which aim to improve understanding of the underlying processes and improve outcomes for patients with AKD.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Biosciences and Medicine
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Chawla, L.S.
Bellomo, R.
Bihorac, A.
Goldstein, S.L.
Siew, E.D.
Bagshaw, S.M.
Bittleman, D.
Cruz, D.
Endre, Z.
Fitzgerald, R.L.
Forni, L.l.forni@surrey.ac.uk
Kane-Gill, S.L.
Hoste, E.
Koyner, J.
Liu, K.D.
MacEdo, E.
Mehta, R.
Murray, P.
Nadim, M.
Ostermann, M.
Palevsky, P.M.
Pannu, N.
Rosner, M.
Wald, R.
Zarbock, A.
Ronco, C.
Kellum, J.A.
Date : 27 February 2017
DOI : 10.1038/nrneph.2017.2
Copyright Disclaimer : © 2017 Macmillan Publishers Limited, part of Springer Nature. All rights reserved. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Depositing User : Diane Maxfield
Date Deposited : 10 Oct 2019 13:35
Last Modified : 10 Oct 2019 13:35
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/852732

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