University of Surrey

Test tubes in the lab Research in the ATI Dance Research

Efficacy and Safety of BCG Vaccine for Control of uberculosis in Domestic Livestock and Wildlife

Buddle, Bryce, Vordermeier, Hans Martin, Chambers, Mark A. and de Klerk-Lorist, Lin-Mari (2018) Efficacy and Safety of BCG Vaccine for Control of uberculosis in Domestic Livestock and Wildlife Frontiers in Veterinary Science, 5.

[img]
Preview
Text
fvets-05-00259.pdf - Version of Record
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (648kB) | Preview

Abstract

Bovine tuberculosis (TB) continues to be an intractable problem in many countries, particularly where “test and slaughter” policies cannot be implemented or where wildlife reservoirs of Mycobacterium bovis infection serve as a recurrent source of infection for domestic livestock. Alternative control measures are urgently required and vaccination is a promising option. Although the M. bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine has been used in humans for nearly a century, its use in animals has been limited, principally as protection against TB has been incomplete and vaccination may result in animals reacting in the tuberculin skin test. Valuable insights have been gained over the past 25 years to optimise protection induced by BCG vaccine in animals and in the development of tests to differentiate infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA). This review examines factors affecting the efficacy of BCG vaccine in cattle, recent field trials, use of DIVA tests and the effectiveness of BCG vaccine in other domestic livestock as well as in wildlife. Oral delivery of BCG vaccine to wildlife reservoirs of infection such as European badgers, brushtail possums, wild boar, and deer has been shown to induce protection against TB and could prove to be a practical means to vaccinate these species at scale. Testing of BCG vaccine in a wide range of animal species has indicated that it is safe and vaccination has the potential to be a valuable tool to assist in the control of TB in both domestic livestock and wildlife.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Veterinary Medicine
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Buddle, Bryce
Vordermeier, Hans Martin
Chambers, Mark A.m.chambers@surrey.ac.uk
de Klerk-Lorist, Lin-Mari
Date : 26 October 2018
Funders : AgResearch New Zealand, Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs UK
DOI : 10.3389/fvets.2018.00259
Copyright Disclaimer : Crown Copyright © 2018 Authors: Buddle, Vordermeier, Chambers and de Klerk-Lorist. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
Uncontrolled Keywords : BCG; Cattle; Diagnosis; Goats; Deer; Tuberculosis; Vaccination; Wildlife
Additional Information : Specialty section: This article was submitted to Veterinary Epidemiology and Economics, a section of the journal Frontiers in Veterinary Science
Depositing User : Diane Maxfield
Date Deposited : 03 Sep 2019 14:58
Last Modified : 03 Sep 2019 14:58
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/852534

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year


Information about this web site

© The University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, United Kingdom.
+44 (0)1483 300800