University of Surrey

Test tubes in the lab Research in the ATI Dance Research

Progress in 3D electrode microstructure modelling for fuel cells and batteries: Transport and electrochemical performance

Zhang, Duo, Bertei, Antonio, Tariq, Farid, Brandon, Nigel and Cai, Qiong (2019) Progress in 3D electrode microstructure modelling for fuel cells and batteries: Transport and electrochemical performance Progress in Energy, 1 (1), 012003. pp. 1-35.

[img] Text
Progress in 3D electrode microstructure modelling for fuel cells and batteries.pdf - Accepted version Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 7 August 2020.
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

Download (1MB)

Abstract

Electrode microstructure plays an important role in the performance of electrochemical energy devices including fuel cells and batteries. Building a clear understanding of how the performance is affected by the electrode microstructure is necessary to design the optimal electrode microstructure, to achieve better device performance. 3D microstructure modelling enables us to perform simulations directly on a 3D electrode microstructure and thus link structure with performance. This paper provides an extensive review on the current state of the art in 3D microstructure modelling of transport and electrochemical performance for four promising electrochemical energy technologies: solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), redox flow batteries (RFBs) and lithium ion batteries (LIBs). Each technology has different electrode microstructures and processes, and thus presents different challenges. The most commonly used modelling methods including the finite element method (FEM) and the finite volume method (FVM) are reviewed, together with the developing lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), with the advantages and disadvantages of each method revealed. Whilst FEM and FVM have been extensively applied in simulating SOFC and LIB electrodes where the methods are capable of dealing with single phase (gas or liquid) transport, they face challenges in simulating the multiphase phenomenon present in PEMFC and some RFB electrodes. LBM is, on the other hand, well suited in simulating gas-liquid two phase flow and applications in PEMFCs and RFBs, as well as single-phase phenomenon in SOFCs and LIBs. The review also points to current challenges in 3D microstructure modelling, including the simulations of nanoscale gas transport and phase transition, moving interfaces associated with structural changes, accurate reactions kinetics, experimental validation, and how to make 3D microstructure modelling truly impactful through the design of better electrochemical devices.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences > Chemical and Process Engineering
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Zhang, Duoduo.zhang@surrey.ac.uk
Bertei, Antonio
Tariq, Farid
Brandon, Nigel
Cai, Qiongq.cai@surrey.ac.uk
Date : 25 September 2019
Funders : Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC)
DOI : 10.1088/2516-1083/ab38c7
Copyright Disclaimer : © 2019 IOP Publishing Ltd. As the Version of Record of this article is going to be/has been published on a subscription basis, this Accepted Manuscript will be available for reuse under a CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 licence after a 12 month embargo period. Although reasonable endeavours have been taken to obtain all necessary permissions from third parties to include their copyrighted content within this article, their full citation and copyright line may not be present in this Accepted Manuscript version. Before using any content from this article, please refer to the Version of Record on IOPscience once published for full citation and copyright details, as permission may be required. All third party content is fully copyright protected, unless specifically stated otherwise in the figure caption of the Version of Record.
Uncontrolled Keywords : 3D microstructure modelling; Transport; Electrochemical performance; Solid oxide fuel cells; Proton exchange membrane fuel cells; Redox flow batteries; Lithium ion batteries
Depositing User : Clive Harris
Date Deposited : 20 Aug 2019 08:56
Last Modified : 15 Nov 2019 15:31
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/852444

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year


Information about this web site

© The University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, United Kingdom.
+44 (0)1483 300800