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Affective responses to coherence in high and low risk scenarios

Gamblin, David M., Banks, Adrian P. and Dean, Philip J. A. (2019) Affective responses to coherence in high and low risk scenarios Cognition and Emotion. pp. 1-19.

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Affective Responses to Coherence in High and Low Risk Scenarios - AAM.pdf - Accepted version Manuscript
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Abstract

Presenting information in a coherent fashion has been shown to increase processing fluency, which in turn influences affective responses. The pattern of responses have been explained by two apparently competing accounts: hedonic marking (response to fluency is positive) and fluency amplification (response to fluency can be positive or negative, depending on stimuli valence). This paper proposes that these accounts are not competing explanations, but separate mechanisms, serving different purposes. Therefore, their individual contributions to overall affective responses should be observable. In three experiments, participants were presented with businesses scenarios, with riskiness (valence) and coherence (fluency) manipulated, and affective responses recorded. Results suggested that increasing the fluency of stimuli increases positive affect. If the stimulus is negative, then increasing fluency simultaneously increases negative affect. These affective responses appeared to cancel each other out (Experiment 1) when measured using self-report bipolar scales. However, separate measurement of positive and negative affect, either using unipolar scales (Experiment 2) or using facial electromyography (Experiment 3), provided evidence for co-occurring positive and negative affective responses, and therefore the co-existence of hedonic marking and fluency amplification mechanisms.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Psychology
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Gamblin, David M.d.m.gamblin@surrey.ac.uk
Banks, Adrian P.A.Banks@surrey.ac.uk
Dean, Philip J. A.P.Dean@surrey.ac.uk
Date : 9 July 2019
DOI : 10.1080/02699931.2019.1640663
Copyright Disclaimer : © 2018 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Cognition and Emotion on 09/07/2019, available online: https://doi.org/10.1080/02699931.2019.1640663
Uncontrolled Keywords : Processing fluency; Coherence; Affect; fEMG
Depositing User : Clive Harris
Date Deposited : 18 Jul 2019 11:07
Last Modified : 18 Jul 2019 11:07
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/852275

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