University of Surrey

Test tubes in the lab Research in the ATI Dance Research

Using in situ simulation to improve care of the acutely ill patient by enhancing interprofessional working: a qualitative proof of concept study in primary care in England

Halls, A., Kanagasundaram, M., Lau-Walker, M., Diack, H. and Bettles, S. (2019) Using in situ simulation to improve care of the acutely ill patient by enhancing interprofessional working: a qualitative proof of concept study in primary care in England BMJ Open, 2019 (9), e028572. pp. 1-9.

[img] Text
Improving care of the acutely ill patient.docx - Accepted version Manuscript
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial.

Download (83kB)

Abstract

Objectives

Acutely unwell patients in general practice are uncommon, but their management requires intervention from staff (clinical and non-clinical) working as a team. Despite the advantages of interprofessional education being well documented, there is little research evidence of this in the primary care setting. This study aimed to improve care of the acutely ill patient by enhancing interprofessional working, using in-situ simulation.

Methods

Mixed methods evaluation study. Phase 1 scoped education provision in GP practices within Health Education England Kent, Surrey and Sussex (HEEKSS) via questionnaire to 668 practices. In Phase 2 a simulation of cardiac arrest occurred in three HEEKSS practices; all staff participated in interviews.

Results

Phase 1 showed the majority of practices ran sessions involving all staff, predominantly focusing on basic life support (BLS) (63 practices) and practice-specific areas such as managing difficult patients (28 practices). 61 said simulation was not used; 41 responded that it was, 37 specifying for BLS training. Qualitative thematic analysis identified four themes: 1) apprehension, anxiety, and (un)willing participation, 2) reflection on the simulation design, 3) experiences of the scenario and 4) training.

Conclusions

Practices made changes in their workplace, potentially benefitting the future management of acutely ill patients. The use of actors and involvement of clinical and non-clinical members of staff contributes to a fuller understanding of how in-situ simulation can benefit both workforce and patients.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Health Sciences
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Halls, A.a.v.halls@surrey.ac.uk
Kanagasundaram, M.
Lau-Walker, M.m.lau-walker@surrey.ac.uk
Diack, H.
Bettles, S.S.Bettles@surrey.ac.uk
Date : 23 July 2019
Funders : Health Education England Kent, Surrey and Sussex
DOI : 10.1136/bmjopen-2018-028572
Copyright Disclaimer : © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2019. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ. This is an open access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited, appropriate credit is given, any changes made indicated, and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.
Uncontrolled Keywords : Primary care; Mixed methods; In-situ simulation; Interprofessional training; Medical emergency; Qualitative research
Depositing User : Clive Harris
Date Deposited : 08 Jul 2019 07:38
Last Modified : 01 Aug 2019 08:28
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/852214

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year


Information about this web site

© The University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, United Kingdom.
+44 (0)1483 300800