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The sexist algorithm

Hamilton, Melissa (2019) The sexist algorithm Behavioral Sciences & the Law, 37 (2). pp. 145-157.

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Abstract

Algorithmic risk assessment tools are informed by scientific research concerning which factors are predictive of recidivism and thus support the evidence‐based practice movement in criminal justice. Automated assessments of individualized risk (low, medium, high) permit officials to make more effective management decisions. Computer-generated algorithms appear to be objective and neutral. But are these algorithms actually fair? The focus herein is on gender equity. Studies confirm that women typically have far lower recidivism rates than men. This differential raises the question of how well algorithmic outcomes fare in terms of predictive parity by gender. This essay reports original research using a large dataset of offenders who were scored on the popular risk assessment tool COMPAS. Findings indicate that COMPAS performs reasonably well at discriminating between recidivists and non‐recidivists for men and women. Nonetheless, COMPAS algorithmic outcomes systemically overclassify women in higher risk groupings. Multiple measures of algorithmic equity and predictive accuracy are provided to support the conclusion that this algorithm is sexist.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences > School of Law
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Hamilton, Melissamelissa.hamilton@surrey.ac.uk
Date : 31 March 2019
DOI : 10.1002/bsl.2406
Copyright Disclaimer : © 2019 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd
Depositing User : Diane Maxfield
Date Deposited : 15 May 2019 11:33
Last Modified : 31 Mar 2020 02:08
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/851836

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