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Dietary protein and bone health across the life-course: an updated systematic review and meta-analysis over 40 years

Darling, A. L., Manders, R. J. F., Sahni, S., Zhu, K., Hewitt, C. E., Prince, R. L., Millward, D. J. and Lanham-New, S. A. (2019) Dietary protein and bone health across the life-course: an updated systematic review and meta-analysis over 40 years Osteoporosis International, 30 (4). pp. 741-761.

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Abstract

We undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis of published papers assessing dietary protein and bone health. We found little benefit of increasing protein intake for bone health in healthy adults but no indication of any detrimental effect, at least within the protein intakes of the populations studied. This systematic review and meta-analysis analysed the relationship between dietary protein and bone health across the life-course. The PubMed database was searched for all relevant human studies from the 1st January 1976 to 22nd January 2016, including all bone outcomes except calcium metabolism. The searches identified 127 papers for inclusion, including 74 correlational studies, 23 fracture or osteoporosis risk studies and 30 supplementation trials. Protein intake accounted for 0–4% of areal BMC and areal BMD variance in adults and 0–14% of areal BMC variance in children and adolescents. However, when confounder adjusted (5 studies) adult lumbar spine and femoral neck BMD associations were not statistically significant. There was no association between protein intake and relative risk (RR) of osteoporotic fractures for total (RR(random) = 0.94; 0.72 to 1.23, I2 = 32%), animal (RR (random) = 0.98; 0.76 to 1.27, I2 = 46%) or vegetable protein (RR (fixed) = 0.97 (0.89 to 1.09, I2 = 15%). In total protein supplementation studies, pooled effect sizes were not statistically significant for LSBMD (total n = 255, MD(fixed) = 0.04 g/cm2 (0.00 to 0.08, P = 0.07), I2 = 0%) or FNBMD (total n = 435, MD(random) = 0.01 g/cm2 (−0.03 to 0.05, P = 0.59), I2 = 68%). There appears to be little benefit of increasing protein intake for bone health in healthy adults but there is also clearly no indication of any detrimental effect, at least within the protein intakes of the populations studied (around 0.8–1.3 g/Kg/day). More studies are urgently required on the association between protein intake and bone health in children and adolescents.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Biosciences and Medicine
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Darling, A. L.A.L.Darling@surrey.ac.uk
Manders, R. J. F.r.manders@surrey.ac.uk
Sahni, S.
Zhu, K.
Hewitt, C. E.
Prince, R. L.
Millward, D. J.D.Millward@surrey.ac.uk
Lanham-New, S. A.S.Lanham-New@surrey.ac.uk
Date : 21 March 2019
DOI : 10.1007/s00198-019-04933-8
Copyright Disclaimer : © International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation 2019
Uncontrolled Keywords : Ageing; Diet; Epidemiology; IGF-1; Nutrition Osteoporosis
Depositing User : Clive Harris
Date Deposited : 15 Apr 2019 11:06
Last Modified : 22 Mar 2020 02:08
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/851066

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