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Review of thermal management of catalytic converters to decrease engine emissions during cold start and warm up

Gao, Jianbing, Tian, Guohong, Sorniotti, Aldo, Karci, Ahu Ece and Di Palo, Raffaele (2019) Review of thermal management of catalytic converters to decrease engine emissions during cold start and warm up Applied Thermal Engineering, 147. pp. 177-187.

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Abstract

Catalytic converters mitigate carbon monoxide, hydrocarbon, nitrogen oxides and particulate matter emissions from internal combustion engines, and allow meeting the increasingly stringent emission regulations. However, catalytic converters experience light-off issues during cold start and warm up. This paper reviews the literature on the thermal management of catalysts, which aims to significantly reduce the light-off time and emission concentrations through appropriate heating methods. In particular, methods based on the control of engine parameters are easily implementable, as they do not require extra heating devices. They present good performance in terms of catalyst light-off time reduction, but bring high fuel penalties, caused by the heat loss and unburnt fuel. Other thermal management methods, such as those based on burners, reformers and electrically heated catalysts, involve the installation of additional devices, but allow flexibility in the location and intensity of the heat injection, which can effectively reduce the heat loss in the tailpipe. Heat storage materials decrease catalyst light-off time, emission concentrations and fuel consumption, but they are not effective if the engine remains switched off for long periods of time. The main recommendation of this survey is that integrated and more advanced thermal management control strategies should be developed to reduce light-off time without significant energy penalty.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences > Mechanical Engineering Sciences
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Gao, Jianbingj.gao@surrey.ac.uk
Tian, Guohongg.tian@surrey.ac.uk
Sorniotti, AldoA.Sorniotti@surrey.ac.uk
Karci, Ahu Ece
Di Palo, Raffaeler.dipalo@surrey.ac.uk
Date : 27 January 2019
Funders : European Commission
DOI : 10.1016/j.applthermaleng.2018.10.037
Grant Title : ADVICE (ADvancing user acceptance of general purpose hybridized Vehicles by Improved Cost and Efficiency) project
Copyright Disclaimer : © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/BY/4.0/).
Uncontrolled Keywords : Internal combustion engine emissions; Cold start; Warm up; Catalyst light-off; Thermal management of catalytic converters
Depositing User : Clive Harris
Date Deposited : 19 Mar 2019 16:21
Last Modified : 19 Mar 2019 16:21
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/850805

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