University of Surrey

Test tubes in the lab Research in the ATI Dance Research

Psychological rumination and recovery from work in intensive care professionals: Associations with stress, burnout, depression and health

Vandevala, Tushna, Pavey, Louisa, Chelidoni, Olga, Chang, Nai-Feng, Creagh-Brown, Ben and Cox, Anna (2017) Psychological rumination and recovery from work in intensive care professionals: Associations with stress, burnout, depression and health Journal of Intensive Care, 5 (1).

[img]
Preview
Text
Psychological rumination and recovery from work in intensive care professionals.pdf - Version of Record
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (553kB) | Preview

Abstract

Background

The work demands of critical care can be a major cause of stress in intensive care unit (ICU) professionals and lead to poor health outcomes. In the process of recovery from work, psychological rumination is considered to be an important mediating variable in the relationship between work demands and health outcomes. This study aimed to extend our knowledge of the process by which ICU stressors and differing rumination styles are associated with burnout, depression and risk of psychiatric morbidity among ICU professionals.

Methods

Ninety-six healthcare professionals (58 doctors and 38 nurses) who work in ICUs in the UK completed a questionnaire on ICU-related stressors, burnout, work-related rumination, depression and risk of psychiatric morbidity.

Results

Significant associations between ICU stressors, affective rumination, burnout, depression and risk of psychiatric morbidity were found. Longer working hours were also related to increased ICU stressors. Affective rumination (but not problem-solving pondering or distraction detachment) mediated the relationship between ICU stressors, burnout, depression and risk of psychiatric morbidity, such that increased ICU stressors, and greater affective rumination, were associated with greater burnout, depression and risk of psychiatric morbidity. No moderating effects were observed.

Conclusions

Longer working hours were associated with increased ICU stressors, and increased ICU stressors conferred greater burnout, depression and risk of psychiatric morbidity via increased affective rumination. The importance of screening healthcare practitioners within intensive care for depression, burnout and psychiatric morbidity has been highlighted. Future research should evaluate psychological interventions which target rumination style and could be made available to those at highest risk. The efficacy and cost effectiveness of delivering these interventions should also be considered.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Biosciences and Medicine
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Vandevala, Tushna
Pavey, Louisa
Chelidoni, Olgao.chelidoni@surrey.ac.uk
Chang, Nai-Feng
Creagh-Brown, Benb.creagh-brown@surrey.ac.uk
Cox, AnnaA.Cox@surrey.ac.uk
Date : 2 February 2017
DOI : 10.1186/s40560-017-0209-0
Copyright Disclaimer : © The Author(s). 2017 Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
Uncontrolled Keywords : Intensive care; Critical care; Stress; Burnout; Health; Rumination;
Depositing User : Clive Harris
Date Deposited : 19 Mar 2019 08:58
Last Modified : 06 Jul 2019 05:26
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/850756

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year


Information about this web site

© The University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, United Kingdom.
+44 (0)1483 300800