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Casein kinase 1 underlies temperature compensation of circadian rhythms in human red blood cells

Beale, Andrew D., Kruchek, Emily, Kitcatt, Stephen J., Henslee, Erin A., Parry, Jack S.W., Braun, Gabriella, Jabr, Rita, von Schantz, Malcolm, O’Neill, John S. and Labeed, Fatima H. (2019) Casein kinase 1 underlies temperature compensation of circadian rhythms in human red blood cells Journal of Biological Rhythms.

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Abstract

Temperature compensation and period determination by casein kinase 1 (CK1) are conserved features of eukaryotic circadian rhythms, whereas the clock gene transcription factors that facilitate daily gene expression rhythms differ between phylogenetic kingdoms. Human red blood cells (RBCs) exhibit temperature compensated circadian rhythms which, since RBCs lack nuclei, must occur in the absence of a circadian transcription-translation feedback loop. We tested whether period determination and temperature compensation are dependent on casein kinases in RBCs. As with nucleated cell types, broad spectrum kinase inhibition with staurosporine lengthened the period of the RBC clock at 37°C, with more specific inhibition of CK1 and CK2 also eliciting robust changes in circadian period. Strikingly, inhibition of CK1 abolished temperature compensation and increased the Q10 for the period of oscillation in RBCs, similar to observations in nucleated cells. This indicates that CK1 activity is essential for circadian rhythms irrespective of the presence or absence of clock gene expression cycles.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences > Mechanical Engineering Sciences
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Beale, Andrew D.a.beale@surrey.ac.uk
Kruchek, Emilye.j.kruchek@surrey.ac.uk
Kitcatt, Stephen J.stephen.kitcatt@surrey.ac.uk
Henslee, Erin A.e.henslee@surrey.ac.uk
Parry, Jack S.W.
Braun, Gabriella
Jabr, Ritarita.jabr@surrey.ac.uk
von Schantz, MalcolmM.Von.Schantz@surrey.ac.uk
O’Neill, John S.
Labeed, Fatima H.F.Labeed@surrey.ac.uk
Date : 2019
Funders : Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC), Medical Research Council (MRC)
Copyright Disclaimer : Copyright 2019 Sage Publications
Uncontrolled Keywords : Casein kinase; Temperature compensation; Erythrocyte; Dielectrophoresis; Electrophysiology
Related URLs :
Depositing User : Clive Harris
Date Deposited : 22 Feb 2019 13:23
Last Modified : 01 Oct 2019 05:09
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/850553

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