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Metabolic syndrome alters relationships between cardiometabolic variables, cognition and white matter hyperintensity load

Alkan, Erkan, Taporoski, T P, Sterr, A, von Schantz, M, Vallada, H, Krieger, J E, Pereira, A C, Alvim, R, Horimoto, A R V R, Pompéia, S , Negrão, A B and Evans, Simon (2019) Metabolic syndrome alters relationships between cardiometabolic variables, cognition and white matter hyperintensity load Scientific Reports, 9, 4356.

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Abstract

Cardiometabolic risk factors influence white matter hyperintensity (WMH) development: in metabolic syndrome (MetS), higher WMH load is often reported but the relationships between specific cardiometabolic variables, WMH load and cognitive performance are uncertain. We investigated these in a Brazilian sample (aged 50-85) with (N=61) and without (N=103) MetS. Stepwise regression models identified effects of cardiometabolic and demographic variables on WMH load (from FLAIR MRI) and verbal recall performance. WMH volume was greater in MetS, but verbal recall performance was not impaired. Age showed the strongest relationship with WMH load. Across all participants, systolic blood pressure (SBP) and fasting blood glucose were also contributors, and WMH volume was negatively associated with verbal recall performance. In non-MetS, higher HbA1c, SBP, and number of MetS components were linked to poorer recall performance while higher triglyceride levels appeared to be protective. In MetS only, these relationships were absent but education exerted a strongly protective effect on recall performance. Thus, results support MetS as a construct: the clustering of cardiometabolic variables in MetS alters their individual relationships with cognition; instead, MetS is characterised by a greater reliance on cognitive reserve mechanisms. In non-MetS, strategies to control HbA1c and SBP should be prioritised as these have the largest impact on cognition.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Alkan, Erkane.alkan@surrey.ac.uk
Taporoski, T P
Sterr, AA.Sterr@surrey.ac.uk
von Schantz, MM.Von.Schantz@surrey.ac.uk
Vallada, H
Krieger, J E
Pereira, A C
Alvim, R
Horimoto, A R V R
Pompéia, S
Negrão, A B
Evans, Simonsimon.evans@surrey.ac.uk
Date : 13 March 2019
DOI : 10.1038/s41598-019-40630-6
Copyright Disclaimer : © The Author(s) 2019 Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Depositing User : Diane Maxfield
Date Deposited : 22 Feb 2019 10:13
Last Modified : 19 Mar 2019 11:13
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/850550

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