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Privacy fit in open-plan offices : its appraisal, associated outcomes & contextual factors.

Weber, Clara (2019) Privacy fit in open-plan offices : its appraisal, associated outcomes & contextual factors. Doctoral thesis, University of Surrey.

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Abstract

Poor work privacy represents a frequently reported issue in open office environments,yet relatively little is known about its consequences. In addition, prior research has limitations including weak operationalisations and measures of privacy. Therefore, this thesis developed a new work privacy measure and examined the adverse effects of poor work privacy on workers’ well-being. The roles of coping appraisal and contextual factors in this relationship were explored to inform future preventative steps. Study 1 (n = 30) qualitatively explored different scenarios of poor work privacy in an open-plan office context for the development of a new measure of privacy fit. Three dimensions of poor work privacy have been identified: acoustical and visual stimulation,interruptions, and confidentiality. Study 2 quantitatively tested (2.A n = 195) and confirmed (2.B n = 109) the factor structure of the new privacy fit measure in two open-plan office worker samples. Four dimensions were identified: conversation confidentiality, task confidentiality, visual/acoustical stimulation, and interruptions. The measure concluded with 12 items, good model fit, reliability, and construct validity. Study 3 (n = 220) employed the newly developed measure and quantitatively examined stress-related consequences of poor privacy fit in an open-plan office worker sample. Poor privacy fit was associated with dissatisfaction, stress, and fatigue. Coping appraisal was found to mediate these relationships. Study 4 (n = 61) quantitatively demonstrated in a longitudinal study that a move to an activity-based office influenced workers’ privacy fit, coping appraisal, and stress-related outcomes (satisfaction, stress, and fatigue). Study 5 (n = 22) qualitatively explored contextual factors in the activity-based Office that support or hinder privacy fit. Four factors were identified: the physical environment (e.g. variety of settings) and the social environment (e.g. social norms), the job (e.g. role conflict), and the self (e.g. self-awareness). This thesis developed a new measure of work privacy and confirmed that privacy fit has an impact on workers’ well-being. The thesis demonstrated the methodological benefit of considering individuals’ appraisal, and the importance of contextual factors in privacy regulation.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Divisions : Theses
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Weber, Clara
Date : 28 February 2019
Funders : Self-funded
DOI : 10.15126/thesis.00850409
Contributors :
ContributionNameEmailORCID
http://www.loc.gov/loc.terms/relators/THSGatersleben, BirgittaB.Gatersleben@surrey.ac.uk
http://www.loc.gov/loc.terms/relators/THSUzzell, DavidD.Uzzell@surrey.ac.uk
http://www.loc.gov/loc.terms/relators/THSOgden, JaneJ.Ogden@surrey.ac.uk
Depositing User : Clara Weber
Date Deposited : 07 Mar 2019 11:16
Last Modified : 07 Mar 2019 11:17
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/850409

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