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Exploring block construction and mental imagery: Evidence of atypical orientation discrimination in Williams syndrome

Farran, Emily and Jarrold, Christoper (2004) Exploring block construction and mental imagery: Evidence of atypical orientation discrimination in Williams syndrome VISUAL COGNITION, 11 (8). pp. 1019-1039.

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Abstract

The visuospatial perceptual abilities of individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) were investigated in two experiments. Experiment 1 measured the ability of participants to discriminate between oblique and between nonoblique orientations. Individuals with WS showed a smaller effect of obliqueness in response time, when compared to controls matched for nonverbal mental age. Experiment 2 investigated the possibility that this deviant pattern of orientation discrimination accounts for the poor ability to perform mental rotation in WS (Farran, Jarrold, & Gathercole, 2001). A size transformation task was employed, which shares the image transformation requirements of mental rotation, but not the orientation discrimination demands. Individuals with WS performed at the same level as controls. The results suggest a deviance at the perceptual level in WS, in processing orientation, which fractionates from the ability to mentally transform images.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Psychology
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Farran, Emilye.farran@surrey.ac.uk
Jarrold, Christoper
Date : 1 November 2004
DOI : 10.1080/13506280444000058
Copyright Disclaimer : Copyright © 2004 Informa UK Limited
Depositing User : Diane Maxfield
Date Deposited : 01 Jul 2019 10:03
Last Modified : 01 Jul 2019 10:03
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/850255

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