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The relationship between perfectionism and quality of life in people with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

Reville, Hannah (2018) The relationship between perfectionism and quality of life in people with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Doctoral thesis, University of Surrey.

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Abstract

Objectives: The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between perfectionism and quality of life in people with Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS). It was hypothesised that people with IBS who score highly on perfectionism will experience a poor quality of life, and that perseverative thinking will mediate this relationship. Methods: A quantitative cross-sectional design was used. Online questionnaires were completed by 418 adults with a diagnosis of IBS. Perfectionism was measured using Hewitt & Flett’s Self-Orientated and Socially Prescribed Perfectionism subscales. Other measures included The Perseverative Thinking Questionnaire and IBS Quality of Life. Correlational and regression analyses were performed in SPSS and mediation analyses using Hayes PROCESS for bootstrapping. Results: Self-Orientated and Socially Prescribed Perfectionism were both found to predict poorer IBS quality of life. Perseverative thinking was found to mediate the relationship between both dimensions of perfectionism and IBS quality of life. Moreover, these associations remained after accounting for the effects of age, gender, comorbidity and duration of IBS. Conclusions: People with IBS who have elevated levels of perfectionism are likely to suffer poorer quality of life, and this is mediated through perseverative thinking. This suggests perfectionism and perseverative thinking are possible perpetuating factors of IBS. Clinicians should consider specifically assessing and targeting these areas for intervention among people with IBS.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Divisions : Theses
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Reville, Hannah
Date : 21 December 2018
Funders : University of Surrey
DOI : 10.15126/thesis.00849663
Contributors :
ContributionNameEmailORCID
http://www.loc.gov/loc.terms/relators/THSJohn, Mary
http://www.loc.gov/loc.terms/relators/THSMorrison, Linda
Depositing User : Hannah Reville
Date Deposited : 25 Jan 2019 10:08
Last Modified : 25 Jan 2019 10:09
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/849663

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