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The experience of white British fathers providing care to a son or daughter with a diagnosis of psychosis : an exploration of fathers’ accounts of coping.

Richardson, Suzanna J. (2018) The experience of white British fathers providing care to a son or daughter with a diagnosis of psychosis : an exploration of fathers’ accounts of coping. Doctoral thesis, University of Surrey.

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Abstract

Aim: Given the move towards community-based care and potential changes in attitudes towards men and caring, it was the aim of this study to explore the experiences of fathers caring for and coping with having a son or daughter with psychosis and begin to identify ‘how’ they cope or ‘what helps’ them to cope in this challenging role. Methods: A qualitative exploratory design was employed using semi-structured interviews. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA). Participants were six white British fathers who self-identified as providing care to their son/daughter who had experienced a first-episode of psychosis, and were under the care of an early intervention team. All fathers were of working age, with a mean age of 56 years and the identified child was living with them at the time of interview. Results: Results suggest that gender identity and masculinity play some role in these fathers’ understanding of their caring role. Strategies that helped them to cope were identified and themes around men and talking emerged as prominent in interviews. Conclusions: With the literature lacking in focused research around coping in relation to parents caring for children with psychosis, and even less focused on fathers, the current research adds valuable research into this important population. Themes suggest that providing opportunities for fathers to talk about their emotions and encouragement to make use of strategies they find effective will enable these fathers to continue providing care to their son or daughter. Implications for clinical practice are discussed.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Divisions : Theses
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Richardson, Suzanna J.
Date : 31 October 2018
Funders : N/A
Contributors :
ContributionNameEmailORCID
http://www.loc.gov/loc.terms/relators/THSMoulton-Perkins, Alesia
http://www.loc.gov/loc.terms/relators/THSGleeson, Kate
Depositing User : Suzanna Richardson
Date Deposited : 05 Nov 2018 08:57
Last Modified : 05 Nov 2018 08:57
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/849514

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