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Peeking into the sleeping brain: Using in vivo imaging in rodents to understand the relationship between sleep and cognition

Sigl-Glöckner, Johanna and Seibt, Julie (2018) Peeking into the sleeping brain: Using in vivo imaging in rodents to understand the relationship between sleep and cognition Journal of Neuroscience Methods.

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Abstract

Sleep is well known to benefit cognitive function. In particular, sleep has been shown to enhance learning and memory in both humans and animals. While the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood, it has been suggested that brain activity during sleep modulates neuronal communication through synaptic plasticity. These insights were mostly gained using electrophysiology to monitor ongoing large scale and single cell activity. While these efforts were instrumental in the characterisation of important network and cellular activity during sleep, several aspects underlying cognition are beyond the reach of this technology. Neuronal circuit activity is dynamically regulated via the precise interaction of different neuronal and non-neuronal cell types and relies on subtle modifications of individual synapses. In contrast to established electrophysiological approaches, recent advances in imaging techniques, mainly applied in rodents, provide unprecedented access to these aspects of neuronal function in vivo. In this review, we describe various techniques currently available for in vivo brain imaging, from single synapse to large scale network activity. We discuss the advantages and limitations of these approaches in the context of sleep research and describe which particular aspects related to cognition lend themselves to this kind of investigation. Finally, we review the few studies that used in vivo imaging in rodents to investigate the sleeping brain and discuss how the results have already significantly contributed to a better understanding on the complex relation between sleep and plasticity across development and adulthood.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Biosciences and Medicine
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Sigl-Glöckner, Johanna
Seibt, Juliej.seibt@surrey.ac.uk
Date : 9 September 2018
Funders : Wellcome Trust
DOI : 10.1016/j.jneumeth.2018.09.011
Copyright Disclaimer : © 2018. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Uncontrolled Keywords : In vivo imaging Electrophysiology Sleep Rodents Cognition Plasticity
Depositing User : Melanie Hughes
Date Deposited : 25 Sep 2018 16:13
Last Modified : 11 Dec 2018 11:24
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/849436

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