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Conceptualising age-appropriate care for teenagers and young adults with cancer: a qualitative mixed methods study

Lea, Sarah, Taylor, Rachel M, Martins, Ana, Fern, Lorna A, Whelan, Jeremy S and Gibson, Faith (2018) Conceptualising age-appropriate care for teenagers and young adults with cancer: a qualitative mixed methods study Adolescent Health, Medicine and Therapeutics.

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Abstract

Purpose:

Teenage and young adult cancer care in England is centralised around 13 principal treatment centres, alongside linked ‘designated’ hospitals, following recommendations that this population should have access to ‘age-appropriate care’. The term ‘age-appropriate care’ has not yet been defined: it is however the explicit term used when communicating the nature of specialist care. The aim in this study was to develop an evidence-based, contextually relevant and operational model defining ‘age-appropriate care’ for teenagers and young adults with cancer.

Patients and methods:

A mixed methods study was conducted comprising (i) semi-structured interview data from young people with cancer and healthcare professionals involved in their care (ii) an integrative literature review to identify current understanding and use of the term ‘age-appropriate care’ (iii) synthesis of both sets of data to form a conceptual model of age-appropriate care. A combination of qualitative content, thematic and framework analysis techniques were used to analyse and integrate data.

Results:

Analysis and synthesis across data sources enabled identification of seven core components of age-appropriate care, which are presented as a conceptual model: best treatment; healthcare professional knowledge; communication, interactions and relationships; recognising individuality; empowering young people; promoting normality; and the environment. Sub-themes of healthcare professional clinical and holistic expertise and the environment comprising of both physical and social elements also emerged.

Conclusion:

The proposed model, necessarily constructed from multiple components, presents an evidence-based, comprehensive structure for understanding the nature of ‘age-appropriate care’. It will be useful to clinicians, health service managers and researchers who are designing, implementing and evaluating interventions that might contribute to the provision of age-appropriate care. While the individual elements of age-appropriate care can exist independently or in part, age-appropriate care is optimal when all seven elements are present, and could be applied to the care of young people with long-term conditions other than cancer.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Health Sciences
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Lea, Sarah
Taylor, Rachel M
Martins, Ana
Fern, Lorna A
Whelan, Jeremy S
Gibson, Faithf.gibson@surrey.ac.uk
Date : 2018
Copyright Disclaimer : This is the author's accepted copy of an article to be published in Adolescent Health, Medicine and Therapeutics, by Dove Medical Press. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution - Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License. By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms.
Uncontrolled Keywords : Teenagers, adolescents, young adults, internet, social media
Depositing User : Melanie Hughes
Date Deposited : 31 Aug 2018 12:01
Last Modified : 31 Aug 2018 12:01
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/849172

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