University of Surrey

Test tubes in the lab Research in the ATI Dance Research

The Sedating Antidepressant Trazodone Impairs Sleep-Dependent Cortical Plasticity

Manzoni, Olivier Jacques, Aton, Sara J., Seibt, Julie, Dumoulin, Michelle C., Coleman, Tammi, Shiraishi, Mia and Frank, Marcos G. (2009) The Sedating Antidepressant Trazodone Impairs Sleep-Dependent Cortical Plasticity PLoS ONE, 4 (7), e6078.

[img]
Preview
Text
__homes.surrey.ac.uk_home_.System_Desktop_Aton&Seibt (2009) PLoS One.pdf - Version of Record

Download (682kB) | Preview

Abstract

Background

Recent findings indicate that certain classes of hypnotics that target GABAA receptors impair sleep-dependent brain plasticity. However, the effects of hypnotics acting at monoamine receptors (e.g., the antidepressant trazodone) on this process are unknown. We therefore assessed the effects of commonly-prescribed medications for the treatment of insomnia (trazodone and the non-benzodiazepine GABAA receptor agonists zaleplon and eszopiclone) in a canonical model of sleep-dependent, in vivo synaptic plasticity in the primary visual cortex (V1) known as ocular dominance plasticity.

Methodology/Principal Findings

After a 6-h baseline period of sleep/wake polysomnographic recording, cats underwent 6 h of continuous waking combined with monocular deprivation (MD) to trigger synaptic remodeling. Cats subsequently received an i.p. injection of either vehicle, trazodone (10 mg/kg), zaleplon (10 mg/kg), or eszopiclone (1–10 mg/kg), and were allowed an 8-h period of post-MD sleep before ocular dominance plasticity was assessed. We found that while zaleplon and eszopiclone had profound effects on sleeping cortical electroencephalographic (EEG) activity, only trazodone (which did not alter EEG activity) significantly impaired sleep-dependent consolidation of ocular dominance plasticity. This was associated with deficits in both the normal depression of V1 neuronal responses to deprived-eye stimulation, and potentiation of responses to non-deprived eye stimulation, which accompany ocular dominance plasticity.

Conclusions/Significance

Taken together, our data suggest that the monoamine receptors targeted by trazodone play an important role in sleep-dependent consolidation of synaptic plasticity. They also demonstrate that changes in sleep architecture are not necessarily reliable predictors of how hypnotics affect sleep-dependent neural functions.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Biosciences and Medicine
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Manzoni, Olivier Jacques
Aton, Sara J.
Seibt, Juliej.seibt@surrey.ac.uk
Dumoulin, Michelle C.
Coleman, Tammi
Shiraishi, Mia
Frank, Marcos G.
Date : 1 July 2009
DOI : 10.1371/journal.pone.0006078
Copyright Disclaimer : Copyright: © 2009 Aton et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Depositing User : Melanie Hughes
Date Deposited : 28 Aug 2018 14:29
Last Modified : 28 Aug 2018 14:29
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/849133

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year


Information about this web site

© The University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, United Kingdom.
+44 (0)1483 300800