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Interactions between cocoa flavanols and inorganic nitrate: Additive effects on endothelial function at achievable dietary amounts

Rodriguez-Mateos, Ana, Hezel, Michael, Aydin, Hilal, Kelm, Malte, Lundberg, Jon O., Weitzberg, Eddie, Spencer, Jeremy P.E. and Heiss, Christian (2015) Interactions between cocoa flavanols and inorganic nitrate: Additive effects on endothelial function at achievable dietary amounts FREE RADICAL BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, 80. pp. 121-128.

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Abstract

Dietary intervention studies have shown that flavanols and inorganic nitrate can improve vascular function, suggesting that these two bioactives may be responsible for beneficial health effects of diets rich in fruits and vegetables. We aimed to study interactions between cocoa flavanols (CF) and nitrate, focusing on absorption, bioavailability, excretion, and efficacy to increase endothelial function. In a double-blind randomized, dose–response crossover study, flow-mediated dilation (FMD) was measured in 15 healthy subjects before and at 1, 2, 3, and 4 h after consumption of CF (1.4–10.9 mg/kg bw) or nitrate (0.1–10 mg/kg bw). To study flavanol–nitrate interactions, an additional intervention trial was performed with nitrate and CF taken in sequence at low and high amounts. FMD was measured before (0 h) and at 1 h after ingestion of nitrate (3 or 8.5 mg/kg bw) or water. Then subjects received a CF drink (2.7 or 10.9 mg/kg bw) or a micro- and macronutrient-matched CF-free drink. FMD was measured at 1, 2, and 4 h thereafter. Blood and urine samples were collected and assessed for CF and nitric oxide (NO) metabolites with HPLC and gas-phase reductive chemiluminescence. Finally, intragastric formation of NO after CF and nitrate consumption was investigated. Both CF and nitrate induced similar intake-dependent increases in FMD. Maximal values were achieved at 1 h postingestion and gradually decreased to reach baseline values at 4 h. These effects were additive at low intake levels, whereas CF did not further increase FMD after high nitrate intake. Nitrate did not affect flavanol absorption, bioavailability, or excretion, but CF enhanced nitrate-related gastric NO formation and attenuated the increase in plasma nitrite after nitrate intake. Both flavanols and inorganic nitrate can improve endothelial function in healthy subjects at intake amounts that are achievable with a normal diet. Even low dietary intake of these bioactives may exert relevant effects on endothelial function when ingested together.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Biosciences and Medicine > Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine
Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Biosciences and Medicine
Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Rodriguez-Mateos, Ana
Hezel, Michael
Aydin, Hilal
Kelm, Malte
Lundberg, Jon O.
Weitzberg, Eddie
Spencer, Jeremy P.E.
Heiss, Christianc.heiss@surrey.ac.uk
Date : March 2015
DOI : 10.1016/j.freeradbiomed.2014.12.009
Copyright Disclaimer : Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Uncontrolled Keywords : Cocoa flavanols; Nitrate; Endothelial function; Interactions; Bioavailability; NO; Free radicals
Depositing User : Diane Maxfield
Date Deposited : 20 Aug 2018 10:54
Last Modified : 20 Aug 2018 10:54
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/849047

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