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Intake and time dependence of blueberry flavonoid–induced improvements in vascular function: a randomized, controlled, double-blind, crossover intervention study with mechanistic insights into biological activity

Rodriguez-Mateos, Ana, Rendeiro, Catarina, Bergillos-Meca, Triana, Tabatabaee, Setareh, George, Trevor W, Heiss, Christian and Spencer, Jeremy PE (2013) Intake and time dependence of blueberry flavonoid–induced improvements in vascular function: a randomized, controlled, double-blind, crossover intervention study with mechanistic insights into biological activity American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 98 (5). pp. 1179-1191.

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Abstract

Background: There are very limited data regarding the effects of blueberry flavonoid intake on vascular function in healthy humans.

Objectives: We investigated the impact of blueberry flavonoid intake on endothelial function in healthy men and assessed potential mechanisms of action by the assessment of circulating metabolites and neutrophil NADPH oxidase activity.

Design: Two randomized, controlled, double-blind, crossover human-intervention trials were conducted with 21 healthy men. Initially, the impact of blueberry flavonoid intake on flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and polyphenol absorption and metabolism was assessed at baseline and 1, 2, 4, and 6 h after consumption of blueberry containing 766, 1278, and 1791 mg total blueberry polyphenols or a macronutrient- and micronutrient-matched control drink (0 mg total blueberry polyphenols). Second, an intake-dependence study was conducted (from baseline to 1 h) with 319, 637, 766, 1278, and 1791 mg total blueberry polyphenols and a control.

Results: We observed a biphasic time-dependent increase in FMD, with significant increases at 1–2 and 6 h after consumption of blueberry polyphenols. No significant intake-dependence was observed between 766 and 1791 mg. However, at 1 h after consumption, FMD increased dose dependently to ≤766 mg total blueberry polyphenol intake, after which FMD plateaued. Increases in FMD were closely linked to increases in circulating metabolites and by decreases in neutrophil NADPH oxidase activity at 1–2 and 6 h.

Conclusions: Blueberry intake acutely improves vascular function in healthy men in a time- and intake-dependent manner. These benefits may be mechanistically linked to the actions of circulating phenolic metabolites on neutrophil NADPH oxidase activity. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01292954 and NCT01829542.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Biosciences and Medicine > Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine
Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Biosciences and Medicine
Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Rodriguez-Mateos, Ana
Rendeiro, Catarina
Bergillos-Meca, Triana
Tabatabaee, Setareh
George, Trevor W
Heiss, Christianc.heiss@surrey.ac.uk
Spencer, Jeremy PE
Date : 4 September 2013
DOI : 10.3945/ajcn.113.066639
Copyright Disclaimer : © 2013 American Society for Nutrition
Uncontrolled Keywords : Vitamins; Minerals; Phytochemicals
Depositing User : Diane Maxfield
Date Deposited : 16 Aug 2018 15:41
Last Modified : 16 Aug 2018 15:41
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/848995

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