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Dietary Nitrate Supplementation Improves Revascularization in Chronic Ischemia

Hendgen-Cotta, U. B., Luedike, P., Totzeck, M., Kropp, M., Schicho, A., Stock, P., Rammos, C., Niessen, M., Heiss, C., Lundberg, J. O. , Weitzberg, E., Kelm, M. and Rassaf, T. (2012) Dietary Nitrate Supplementation Improves Revascularization in Chronic Ischemia CIRCULATION, 126 (16). pp. 1983-1992.

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Revascularization is an adaptive repair mechanism that restores blood flow to undersupplied ischemic tissue. Nitric oxide plays an important role in this process. Whether dietary nitrate, serially reduced to nitrite by commensal bacteria in the oral cavity and subsequently to nitric oxide and other nitrogen oxides, enhances ischemia-induced remodeling of the vascular network is not known. METHODS AND RESULTS: Mice were treated with either nitrate (1 g/L sodium nitrate in drinking water) or sodium chloride (control) for 14 days. At day 7, unilateral hind-limb surgery with excision of the left femoral artery was conducted. Blood flow was determined by laser Doppler. Capillary density, myoblast apoptosis, mobilization of CD34(+)/Flk-1(+), migration of bone marrow-derived CD31(+)/CD45(-), plasma S-nitrosothiols, nitrite, and skeletal tissue cGMP levels were assessed. Enhanced green fluorescence protein transgenic mice were used for bone marrow transplantation. Dietary nitrate increased plasma S-nitrosothiols and nitrite, enhanced revascularization, increased mobilization of CD34(+)/Flk-1(+) and migration of bone marrow-derived CD31(+)/CD45(-) cells to the site of ischemia, and attenuated apoptosis of potentially regenerative myoblasts in chronically ischemic tissue. The regenerative effects of nitrate treatment were abolished by eradication of the nitrate-reducing bacteria in the oral cavity through the use of an antiseptic mouthwash. CONCLUSIONS: Long-term dietary nitrate supplementation may represent a novel nutrition-based strategy to enhance ischemia-induced revascularization.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Biosciences and Medicine > Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine
Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Biosciences and Medicine
Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Hendgen-Cotta, U. B.
Luedike, P.
Totzeck, M.
Kropp, M.
Schicho, A.
Stock, P.
Rammos, C.
Niessen, M.
Heiss, C.c.heiss@surrey.ac.uk
Lundberg, J. O.
Weitzberg, E.
Kelm, M.
Rassaf, T.
Date : 19 September 2012
DOI : 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.112.112912
Copyright Disclaimer : © 2012 American Heart Association, Inc.
Uncontrolled Keywords : Nitrates; Nitric oxide; Nitrites; Mouthwashes; Revascularization
Depositing User : Diane Maxfield
Date Deposited : 16 Aug 2018 13:42
Last Modified : 16 Aug 2018 13:42
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/848985

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