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Identification and quantification of novel cranberry-derived plasma and urinary (poly)phenols

Feliciano, Rodrigo P., Boeres, Albert, Massacessi, Luca, Istas, Geoffrey, Ventura, M. Rita, Nunes dos Santos, Cláudia, Heiss, Christian and Rodriguez-Mateos, Ana (2016) Identification and quantification of novel cranberry-derived plasma and urinary (poly)phenols Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics, 599. pp. 31-41.

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Abstract

Cranberries are a rich source of (poly)phenols, in particular proanthocyanidins, anthocyanins, flavonols, and phenolic acids. However, little is known about their bioavailability in humans. We investigated the absorption, metabolism, and excretion of cranberry (poly)phenols in plasma and urine of healthy young men after consumption of a cranberry juice (787 mg (poly)phenols). A total of 60 cranberry-derived phenolic metabolites were identified using UPLC-Q-TOF-MS analysis with authentic standards. These included sulfates of pyrogallol, valerolactone, benzoic acids, phenylacetic acids, glucuronides of flavonols, as well as sulfates and glucuronides of cinnamic acids. The most abundant plasma metabolites were small phenolic compounds, in particular hippuric acid, catechol-O-sulfate, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid, phenylacetic acid, isoferulic acid, 4-methylcatechol-O-sulfate, α-hydroxyhippuric acid, ferulic acid 4-O-sulfate, benzoic acid, 4-hydroxyphenyl acetic acid, dihydrocaffeic acid 3-O-sulfate, and vanillic acid-4-O-sulfate. Some benzoic acids, cinnamic acids, and flavonol metabolites appeared in plasma early, at 1–2 h post-consumption. Others such as phenylacetic acids, benzaldehydes, pyrogallols, catechols, hippuric and dihydrocinnamic acid derivatives appear in plasma later (Tmax 4–22 h). The 24 h urinary recovery with respect to the amount of (poly)phenols consumed was 6.2%. Our extensive description of the bioavailability of cranberry (poly)phenols lays important groundwork necessary to start understanding the fate of these compounds in humans.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Biosciences and Medicine
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Feliciano, Rodrigo P.
Boeres, Albert
Massacessi, Luca
Istas, Geoffrey
Ventura, M. Rita
Nunes dos Santos, Cláudia
Heiss, Christianc.heiss@surrey.ac.uk
Rodriguez-Mateos, Ana
Date : 4 February 2016
DOI : 10.1016/j.abb.2016.01.014
Uncontrolled Keywords : Cranberry (Poly)phenols Bioavailability Absorption Metabolism Excretion
Depositing User : Melanie Hughes
Date Deposited : 16 Aug 2018 12:05
Last Modified : 16 Aug 2018 12:05
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/848977

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