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The effects of dietary supplementation with inulin and inulin-propionate ester on hepatic steatosis in adults with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

Chambers, Edward S., Byrne, Claire S., Rugyendo, Annette, Morrison, Douglas J., Preston, Tom, Tedford, M. Catriona, Bell, Jimmy D., Thomas, E. Louise, Akbar, Arne N., Riddell, Natalie E. , Sharma, Rohini, Thursz, Mark R., Manousou, Pinelopi and Frost, Gary (2018) The effects of dietary supplementation with inulin and inulin-propionate ester on hepatic steatosis in adults with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.

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Abstract

The short chain fatty acid (SCFA) propionate, produced through fermentation of dietary fibre by the gut microbiota, has been shown to alter hepatic metabolic processes that reduce lipid storage. We aimed to investigate the impact of raising colonic propionate production on hepatic steatosis in adults with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Eighteen adults were randomised to receive 20g/day of an inulin-propionate ester (IPE), designed to deliver propionate to the colon, or an inulin-control for 42-days in a parallel design. The change in intrahepatocellular lipid (IHCL) following the supplementation period was not different between groups (P=0.082), however IHCL significantly increased within the inulin-control group (20.9±2.9 to 26.8±3.9%; P=0.012; n=9), which was not observed within the IPE group (22.6±6.9 to 23.5±6.8%; P=0.635; n=9). The predominant SCFA from colonic fermentation of inulin is acetate, which in a background of NAFLD and a hepatic metabolic profile that promotes fat accretion, may provide surplus lipogenic substrate to the liver. The increased colonic delivery of propionate from IPE appears to attenuate this acetatemediated increase in IHCL.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Biosciences and Medicine
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Chambers, Edward S.
Byrne, Claire S.
Rugyendo, Annette
Morrison, Douglas J.
Preston, Tom
Tedford, M. Catriona
Bell, Jimmy D.
Thomas, E. Louise
Akbar, Arne N.
Riddell, Natalie E.n.riddell@surrey.ac.uk
Sharma, Rohini
Thursz, Mark R.
Manousou, Pinelopi
Frost, Gary
Date : 11 August 2018
Funders : Medical Research Council (MRC), Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC)
DOI : 10.1111/dom.13500
Copyright Disclaimer : This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Depositing User : Clive Harris
Date Deposited : 13 Aug 2018 22:45
Last Modified : 12 Aug 2019 02:08
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/848913

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