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Elevated high density lipoprotein cholesterol and low grade systemic inflammation is associated with increased gut permeability in normoglycemic men

Robertson, MD, Pedersen, C, Hinton, PA, Mendis, ASJR, Cani, PD and Griffin, BA (2018) Elevated high density lipoprotein cholesterol and low grade systemic inflammation is associated with increased gut permeability in normoglycemic men Nutrition, Metabolism & Cardiovascular Diseases, 28 (12). pp. 1296-1303.

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Abstract

Background & Aims:

Serum lipids and lipoproteins are established biomarkers of cardiovascular disease risk that could be influenced by impaired gut barrier function via effects on the absorption of dietary and biliary cholesterol. The aim of this study was to examine the potential relationship between gut barrier function (gut permeability) and concentration of serum lipids and lipoproteins, in an ancillary analysis of serum samples taken from a previous study.

Methods and Results:

Serum lipids, lipoproteins and functional gut permeability, as assessed by the percentage of the urinary recovery of 51-Cr-labelled EDTA absorbed within 24h, were measured in a group of 30 healthy men. Serum lipopolysaccharide, high sensitivity C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 were also measured as markers of low-grade inflammation. The group expressed a 5- fold variation in total gut permeability (1.11 - 5.03%). Gut permeability was unrelated to the concentration of both serum total and low density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol, but was positively associated with serum high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol (r=0.434, P=0.015). Serum HDL cholesterol was also positively associated with serum endotoxaemia (r=0.415, p=0.023).

Conclusion:

The significant association between increased gut permeability and elevated serum HDL-cholesterol is consistent with the role of HDL as an acute phase reactant, and in this situation, potentially dysfunctional lipoprotein. This finding may have negative implications for the putative role of HDL as a cardio-protective lipoprotein.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Biosciences and Medicine
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Robertson, MDM.Robertson@surrey.ac.uk
Pedersen, C
Hinton, PA
Mendis, ASJR
Cani, PD
Griffin, BAB.Griffin@surrey.ac.uk
Date : December 2018
Funders : National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), European Research Council (ERC)
DOI : 10.1016/j.numecd.2018.07.006
Copyright Disclaimer : © 2018. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Uncontrolled Keywords : Barrier function; Endotoxin; Lipid; LDL cholesterol
Related URLs :
Depositing User : Clive Harris
Date Deposited : 24 Jul 2018 10:43
Last Modified : 02 Aug 2019 02:08
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/848769

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