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Managing behavioural and psychological symptoms in community dwelling older people with dementia: 2. A systematic review of qualitative studies

Braun, Andreas, Trivedi, Daksha P, Dickinson, Angela, Hamilton, Laura, Goodman, Claire, Gage, Heather, Ashaye, Kunle, Iliffe, Steve and Manthorpe, Jill (2018) Managing behavioural and psychological symptoms in community dwelling older people with dementia: 2. A systematic review of qualitative studies Dementia. pp. 1-21.

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Abstract

Background

People living with dementia often develop distressing behavioural and psychological symptoms (BPSD) that can affect their quality of life and the capacity of family carers and staff providing support at home. This systematic review of qualitative studies considers the views and experiences of people living with dementia and care providers about these symptoms and what helps to reduce their impact.

Methods

The two-stage review involved (a) An initial mapping of the literature to understand the range of BPSD, and how it is operationalised by different groups, to develop a search strategy; (b) A search of electronic databases from January 2000 to March 2015, updated in October 2016. Included studies focused on people living in their own homes. Data extraction and thematic analysis were structured to provide a narrative synthesis of the evidence.

Results

We retrieved 17, 871 records and included relevant qualitative papers (n = 58) targeting community-dwelling people with dementia and family carers around the management of BPSD. Five key themes were identified: (1) Helpful interventions/support for BPSD management, (2) Barriers to support services for BPSD management, (3) Challenges around recognition/diagnosis of BPSD, (4) Difficulties in responding to aggression and other BPSD, and (5) Impact of BPSD on family carers and people living with dementia.

Conclusions

Family carers sometimes feel that their experiences of BPSD may not be evident to professionals until a crisis point is reached. Some helpful services exist but access to support, lack of knowledge and skills, and limited information are consistently identified as barriers to their uptake. The lack of common terminology to identify and monitor the range of BPSD that people with dementia living at home may experience means that closer attention should be paid to family carer accounts. Future research should include qualitative studies to evaluate the relevance of interventions.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Biosciences and Medicine
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Braun, Andreas
Trivedi, Daksha P
Dickinson, Angela
Hamilton, Laura
Goodman, Claire
Gage, HeatherH.Gage@surrey.ac.uk
Ashaye, Kunle
Iliffe, Steve
Manthorpe, Jill
Date : 20 March 2018
DOI : 10.1177/1471301218762856
Copyright Disclaimer : © The Author(s) 2018. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License (http://www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits any use, reproduction and distribution of the work without further permission provided the original work is attributed as specified on the SAGE and Open Access pages (https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/open-access-at-sage).
Uncontrolled Keywords : Behavioural and psychological symptoms; Challenging behaviour; Dementia; Carers; Community; Systematic review
Depositing User : Clive Harris
Date Deposited : 16 Jul 2018 15:21
Last Modified : 17 Jul 2018 07:24
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/848719

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