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A pilot feasibility study exploring the effects of a moderate time-restricted feeding intervention on energy intake, adiposity and metabolic physiology in free-living humans.

Antoni, Rona, Robertson, Tracey, Robertson, Denise and Johnston, Jonathan (2018) A pilot feasibility study exploring the effects of a moderate time-restricted feeding intervention on energy intake, adiposity and metabolic physiology in free-living humans. Journal of Nutritional Science., 7, e22. e22-1 - e22-6.

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Abstract

This pilot study explored the feasibility of a moderate time-restricted feeding (TRF) intervention and its effects on adiposity and metabolism. For ten weeks, a free-living TRF group (n=9) delayed breakfast and advanced dinner by 1.5-hours each. Changes in dietary intake, adiposity and fasting biochemistry (glucose, insulin, lipids) were compared to controls (n=7) who maintained habitual feeding patterns. Thirteen participants (29±2kg/m2) completed. The average daily feeding interval was successfully reduced in the TRF group (743±32 to 517±22 mins/day (p<0.001); n=7), although questionnaire responses indicated that social eating/drinking opportunities were negatively impacted. TRF participants reduced total daily energy intake (p=0.019) despite ad libitum food access, with accompanying reductions in adiposity (p=0.047). There were significant between-group differences in fasting glucose (p=0.008), albeit driven primarily by an increase among controls. Larger studies can now be designed/powered, based on these novel preliminary qualitative and quantitative data, to ascertain and maximize the long-term sustainability of TRF.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Biosciences and Medicine
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Antoni, Ronar.c.antoni@surrey.ac.uk
Robertson, Traceyt.m.robertson@surrey.ac.uk
Robertson, DeniseM.Robertson@surrey.ac.uk
Johnston, JonathanJ.Johnston@surrey.ac.uk
Date : 30 August 2018
Copyright Disclaimer : © The Author(s) 2018. This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons. org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Uncontrolled Keywords : Chrononutrition; Circadian rhythm; Intermittent fasting; Metabolism; Food intake
Depositing User : Melanie Hughes
Date Deposited : 11 Jul 2018 13:22
Last Modified : 05 Sep 2018 13:06
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/848684

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