University of Surrey

Test tubes in the lab Research in the ATI Dance Research

Resource implications of a brief psychology triage tool for patients pre bariatric surgery: An audit of patient pathways

Ogden, Jane, Ward, N, Hollywood, A and Pring, C (2018) Resource implications of a brief psychology triage tool for patients pre bariatric surgery: An audit of patient pathways Annals of Bariatrics & Metabolic Surgery, 1, 1002.

[img]
Preview
Text
__homes.surrey.ac.uk_home_.System_Desktop_ABMS 1002.pdf - Version of Record
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (509kB) | Preview
[img] Text
__homes.surrey.ac.uk_home_.System_Desktop_triageWLS.docx - Accepted version Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only

Download (48kB)

Abstract

Purpose:

Due to resource limitations, psychological support for bariatric patients needs to be targeted to those most in need. This study aimed to evaluate the resource implications of a brief triage tool to identify and support those most at risk from poorer outcomes

Materials and methods:

A four stage process was used involving: Expert consensus; the selection of appropriate measures; A patient cohort over two years; A resource analysis

Results:

Three key psychological contra-indications for bariatric surgery were identified by expert psychologists (n=45) as alcohol and drug dependency and suicidality. Next, existing validated measures were selected based upon the literature to form the Bariatric Triage Tool (BTT) consisting of the AUDIT, DAST-10 and SBQ-R. Consecutive patients at one UK bariatric clinic then completed the BTT for 2 years (n=484). Of these under a fifth were identified as at risk (n=85; 17.6%) and referred for an in depth one to one assessment with a bariatric psychologist. Of these 7 (1.4%) were referred to their GP for further psychological support and removed from the surgical pathway. Finally, resource implications were evaluated and indicated that the BTT saved both money (between £15 and £105 per patient depending on the metric) and time (just under one hour per patient) which could be used to target those patients most in need of psychological support

Conclusion:

The BTT is a brief, easy to self-administer tool that could be used to identify those most at risk and ensure that psychological support is targeted to those most in need

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Psychology
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Ogden, JaneJ.Ogden@surrey.ac.uk
Ward, N
Hollywood, A
Pring, C
Date : 15 June 2018
Copyright Disclaimer : Copyright: © Ogden J (2018). This Article is distributed under the terms of Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License
Uncontrolled Keywords : Bariatric surgery; Triage tool; Psychology; Contra indications; Dependency; Suicidality; Risk
Depositing User : Melanie Hughes
Date Deposited : 04 Jul 2018 13:16
Last Modified : 19 Jun 2019 10:52
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/848650

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year


Information about this web site

© The University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, United Kingdom.
+44 (0)1483 300800