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The effect on tactile discrimination following hand and total body immersion in warm and cold water; With particular reference to diver performance.

Lewis, Glanfyll L. R. (1974) The effect on tactile discrimination following hand and total body immersion in warm and cold water; With particular reference to diver performance. Doctoral thesis, University of Surrey (United Kingdom)..

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Abstract

A method has been described to measure the changes occurring in tactile discrimination following hand and total body immersion in various kinds of water at 5°C. 14°C. and 32°C. Results show significant deterioration in tactile discrimination of the palmar and dorsal regions of the hand following immersion in water at 5°C when compared with a dry control condition. Similar deteriorations were noted following hand immersions in water at 14°C and 32°C. Results achieved from subjects totally immersed in water at temperatures of 14°C and 32°C showed a significant deterioration in tactile discrimination of the palmar region of the hand as compared to a dry control condition. It can be concluded that hand immersion in any kind of water at 5°C significantly affects tactile discrimination and that hand immersion and total body immersion in water at temperatures of 14°C and 32°C results in a significant deterioration in tactile sensitivity. For the 32°C condition a 'wet' effect rather than a 'cold' effect is seen to be the major contributory factor in causing such a decrement, bearing in mind that the body temperature for the hand immersion is maintained in a controlled air environment of 18°C - 20°C and for the total immersion is kept at normal temperature by a wet-suit in water at 32°C. The present study differs from previous work insofar as it deals with changes occurring in tactile sensitivity following immersion, rather than during immersion, and is therefore directly related to the condition of divers carrying out manual operations immediately following a dive.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Divisions : Theses
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Lewis, Glanfyll L. R.
Date : 1974
Contributors :
ContributionNameEmailORCID
http://www.loc.gov/loc.terms/relators/THS
Additional Information : Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Surrey (United Kingdom), 1974.
Depositing User : EPrints Services
Date Deposited : 22 Jun 2018 13:56
Last Modified : 06 Nov 2018 16:53
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/847638

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