University of Surrey

Test tubes in the lab Research in the ATI Dance Research

Characterisation of CapC, a novel autotransporter and virulence factor of Campylobacter jejuni

Mehat, Jai W., Park, Simon F., van Vliet, Arnoud H. M. and La Ragione, Roberto M. (2018) Characterisation of CapC, a novel autotransporter and virulence factor of Campylobacter jejuni Applied and Environmental Microbiology. e01032-18.

[img]
Preview
Text
Characterisation of CapC.pdf - Accepted version Manuscript

Download (529kB) | Preview

Abstract

Campylobacter jejuni is recognized as an important causative agent of bacterial gastroenteritis in the developed world. Despite the identification of several factors contributing to infection, characterization of the virulence strategies employed by C. jejuni remains a significant challenge. Bacterial autotransporter proteins are a major class of secretory proteins in Gram-negative bacteria and notably many autotransporter proteins contribute to bacterial virulence. The aim of this study was to characterise the C. jejuni 81116 C8J_1278 gene (capC), predicted to encode an autotransporter protein, and examine the contribution of this factor to virulence of Campylobacter jejuni. The predicted CapC protein has a number of features that are consistent with autotransporters including the N-terminal signal sequence and the C-terminal β-barrel domain and was determined to localise to the outer membrane. Inactivation of the capC gene in C. jejuni 81116 and C. jejuni M1 resulted in reduced insecticidal activity in Galleria mellonella larvae. Furthermore, C. jejuni capC mutants displayed significantly reduced adherence to and invasion of non-polarized, partially differentiated Caco-2 and T84 intestinal epithelial cells. Gentamicin treatment showed that the reduced invasion of the capC mutant is primarily caused by reduced adherence to intestinal epithelial cells, not by reduced invasion capability. C. jejuni capC mutants caused reduced IL-8 secretion from intestinal epithelial cells and elicited a significantly diminished immune reaction in Galleria larvae indicating that CapC functions as an immunogen. In conclusion, CapC is a new virulence determinant of C. jejuni that contributes to the integral infection process of adhesion to human intestinal epithelial cells.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Veterinary Medicine
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Mehat, Jai W.jw.mehat@surrey.ac.uk
Park, Simon F.S.Park@surrey.ac.uk
van Vliet, Arnoud H. M.a.vanvliet@surrey.ac.uk
La Ragione, Roberto M.R.Laragione@surrey.ac.uk
Date : 18 June 2018
DOI : 10.1128/aem.01032-18
Copyright Disclaimer : © 2018 American Society for Microbiology
Depositing User : Clive Harris
Date Deposited : 20 Jun 2018 08:34
Last Modified : 05 Oct 2018 09:17
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/847077

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year


Information about this web site

© The University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, United Kingdom.
+44 (0)1483 300800