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Social support following diagnosis and treatment for colorectal cancer and associations with health‐related quality of life:Results from the UK ColoREctal Wellbeing (CREW) cohort study

Haviland, J, Sodergren, S, Calman, L, Corner, J, Din, A, Fenlon, D, Grimmett, C, Richardson, A, Smith, P and Winter, J (2017) Social support following diagnosis and treatment for colorectal cancer and associations with health‐related quality of life:Results from the UK ColoREctal Wellbeing (CREW) cohort study Psycho‐Oncology, 26 (12). pp. 2276-2284.

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Abstract

Objective Social support is acknowledged as important in cancer survivorship, but little is known about change in support after cancer diagnosis and factors associated with this, particularly in colorectal cancer. The CREW cohort study investigated social support up to 2 years following curative intent surgery for colorectal cancer. Methods A total of 871 adults recruited pre‐treatment from 29 UK centres 2010 to 2012 consented to follow‐up. Questionnaires at baseline, 3, 9, 15, and 24 months post‐surgery included assessments of social support (Medical Outcomes Study‐Social Support Survey, MOS‐SSS) and health‐related quality of life (HRQoL). Socio‐demographic, clinical and treatment details were collected. Longitudinal analyses assessed social support over follow‐up, associations with participant characteristics, and HRQoL. Results Around 20% were living alone and 30% without a partner. Perceived social support declined in around 29% of participants, with 8% of these reporting very low levels overall from baseline to 2 years (mean MOS‐SSS overall score < 40 on a scale from 0 to 100). Older age, female gender, greater neighbourhood deprivation, presence of co‐morbidities, and rectal cancer site were significantly associated with reductions in perceived support. Poorer HRQoL outcomes (generic health/QoL, reduced wellbeing, anxiety, and depression) were significantly associated with lower levels of social support. Conclusions Levels of social support decline following colorectal cancer diagnosis and treatment in nearly a third of patients and are an important risk factor for recovery of HRQoL. Assessment of support early on and throughout follow‐up would enable targeted interventions to improve recovery, particularly in the more vulnerable patient groups at risk of poorer social support.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Health Sciences
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Haviland, J
Sodergren, S
Calman, L
Corner, J
Din, A
Fenlon, D
Grimmett, C
Richardson, A
Smith, P
Winter, J
Date : 1 November 2017
DOI : 10.1002/pon.4556
Copyright Disclaimer : This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providedthe original work is properly cited.© 2017 The Authors. Psycho‐Oncology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd
Contributors :
ContributionNameEmailORCID
Poole, Karenk.poole@surrey.ac.uk
Uncontrolled Keywords : cancer survivorship, colorectal cancer, health‐related quality of life, oncology, social support
Depositing User : Melanie Hughes
Date Deposited : 19 Jun 2018 16:21
Last Modified : 31 Jul 2018 13:26
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/847074

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